Monday, January 21, 2013

Report: 7-Eleven wants to 'make the lives of neighborhood residents better'


The New York Times checks in today worth a piece titled "East Village Protests Its New but Familiar Neighbor" about the increasing unrest over the incoming 7-Eleven on Avenue and East 11th Street.

In part, the article recaps last week's No 7-Eleven meeting ... In addition, reporter Colin Moynihan hears from 7-Eleven about their intentions...

A 7-Eleven spokeswoman, Margaret Chabris, said by e-mail that the company had decided that “a high concentration of young adults and young families on a budget” made the East Village a good spot to open stores.

We want to make the lives of neighborhood residents better by offering a dependable and convenient environment with value-priced goods,” she wrote. “If we fulfill that mission, the community will support these stores as they have in other areas of New York City.”

Read the whole article, which includes a mention of EV Grieve and "A man who introduced himself to the crowd as Liberation," here.

Previously on EV Grieve:
[Updated] More from the anti-7-Eleven front on Avenue A and East 11th Street

7-Eleven alert: Are 2 chain stores replacing Bar on A and Angels & Kings?

First sign of the incoming 7-Eleven on Avenue A

31 comments:

Anonymous said...

If one was inclined to email the 7-11 spokesperson mentioned in the article, a Google search on her name would easily lead you to the bottom of this public web page.

Anonymous said...

"Value-priced"? I haven't walked into a 7-11 for 4 years, but from what I remember, the stores are not exactly cheap. For those of us on a tight budget, KeyFood / FineFare or bodegas (for fruit / veggies) it is. And the fact that they sell mostly processed crap won't help make our neighborhood happy or healthy.

evilnyc said...

This is where you can contact 7 Eleven:

http://corp.7-eleven.com/ContactUs/tabid/184/Default.aspx

I just sent a piece of my mind. Its cathartic if nothing else.

Ken from Ken's Kitchen said...

Margaret Chabris exaggerates. Being able to run into a 7-11 to grab a Slurpee or a Big Gulp fountain soft drink will not make my "life better." And all the other shit they sell is already available at existing delis and convenience stores.

vzabuser said...

Most of the stuff in there is overpriced. Yes there are some discounted stuff bought with 7-11's power to purchase as a chain, but do we really wan't their smelly greasy fare?
As I've posted before- their baked goods are from the Glen Wayne Bakery in Bohemia NY (there since 1980) and compete favorably with other outlets- but the overpricing of deli items like flashlights and shoelaces is outrageous.
There are pluses and minuses here..not a clear issue

Ken from Ken's Kitchen said...

Possibly the douchiest post I've ever seen on Gothamist is on the 11th St 7-11, purportedly written by a resident of the EV. It's new and it's here if you want to comment: http://gothamist.com/2013/01/21/i_give_up_east_villager_resigns_him.php

Anonymous said...

Let me share my hot chocolate story: I was near the 7-Eleven on Broadway the morning it opened, and the manager outside was handing out passes for free coffee. I was like, thanks, but no thanks. I don't drink coffee. I drink hot chocolate. He said, go get yourself a hot chocolate, and he was so insistent I finally said, great, thanks. I went inside, and the world's bitchiest employee started yelling at me that I couldn't have a hot chocolate. Right away, she was all up in arms like I was committing the hugest offense. I was like, okay, fine. It's just that the guy outside said I could have one, and I left. I saw him, and he asked me where my drink was, and I told him the lady wouldn't let me have one. He said he was the manager and told me to go back in and tell her he said it was okay. And I said, I don't really need the hot chocolate that bad. It's okay. But, geez, was that woman inside the store mean to me. For that reason alone, I won't step foot in another 7-11. I would rather go to the little bodega where at least the guys don't have an attitude!

Anonymous said...

There is an inaccuracy in the Times story. He says there aren't chains like Dunkin' Donuts north of Houston between A and B, but there is a Dunkin' Donuts on 14th Street between A and B.

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

From a recent article in the Internation Business Times:

"The fight against chain-store proliferation -- in New York and urban areas across the country -- is not a new one, but evidence that chain stores have an overall negative impact on their local economies is growing. A Maine Center for Economic Policy study published in December 2011 found that, for every $100 spent, locally owned business contribute $58 to the local economy, compared with $33 for chain stores."

[Source]

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

This is what a 7-Eleven spokesperson had to say in response to the meeting:

""We see opportunity in many areas of Manhattan. Currently, this part of the East Village is underserved, and there are several neighboring outlets that have closed," Margaret Chabris, spokeswoman for 7-Eleven, told CSNews Online. "7-Eleven will provide attractive stores and bring new jobs, a franchise business opportunity and services to this part of town.""

[Source]

JAZ said...

I'm trying to think of anything they carry that someone would need which can't be purchased already for less money within a very short walk of 11th & A.

It would be nice if they could specify exactly what they are offering that can't already be found. Of course, they don't do this because it would be laughably simple to rebut any specifics. Since they are making a point of wanting to come in order to help the community, if we can prove point by point that it's already covered, you think they'll just find someplace their help would be more 'needed'? Yeah, me neither.

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

@JAZ You're right. The bodega on Avenue A and 12th Street - one block away - is relatively new and carries the same type of merchandise. Not to mention the bodega on Avenue A just south of 10th, a block and quarter away.

It would be great to have a map of ALL the local bodegas to shove back at their corporate talking heads.

I had to laugh at Margaret Chabris's language, "attractive stores" in "this part of town," says the lady from Texas. Read what you want into that.

Anonymous said...

What's sad is they carry no food of redeeming value. Some the bodegas will at least have some fresh fruit on hand. This chain peddles only junk food and high-calorie sugary drinks.

Anonymous said...

The problem is 7-11 is like mc Donald's, it isn't just a store it is a distributer. Therefore the individual store does not have say in stocking it's store with products that are not on the list of 7-11 approved items....

And in regards to being healthy... Please, they are all and only about profit, and the profits are terrible in healthy food...

But I truly don't see this working, why would a inderpendant store sign up to being a chain, especially as once they do, the majority of their customers will go else where...

Anonymous said...

Number 2 of 6 Offensively Enormous Beverages - 7-Eleven's 44-Ounce Super Big Gulp is 512 calories and contains 128 grams of sugar. It's the same amount of calories in a bag of salt and vinegar potato chips, a bag of M&Ms, and 24 almonds.

Marty Wombacher said...

If you want to see one of their "value-priced goods" check out one of my MAD posts below, where I went and sampled their barbecue sandwich from the one on 14th Street. I didn't think there was anything that would make the McRib seem palatable, but they pulled it off! And check out their microwave oven, filthy!

http://ow.ly/h061w

Super Size Me said...

And now some reviews from happy 7-Eleven ranchise owners:

"I have been a 7-eleven Franchisee for the past 2 years. This is a like a MAFIA operation, please DO NOT fall for them. They mistreat their franchisees on different levels, neither good accounting infrastructure nor maintenance infrastructure.

They make various promises as you are signing up for their franchise but the ones who make the promise disappear or make a 360-degree turn on their commitment. Old stores and equipment which keep on breaking and expect you to get fixed and pay and on top of it have the audacity to ask and force you through their different cheap legal business tactics to keep shining their almost dead equipment around the store such as old hot dog grills, sandwich case, bathrooms, floor tiles etc.

They keep finding ways to charge franchisees for various things with erroneous charges. On their mistaken charges it takes months and years to get your money back, their accounting ways and gross profit sharing is completely controlled by them MAFIA like. They have an on off button as to how much money you should make and keep slogging yourself like a modern day slave for their profits with no empathy of ones commitment to their family."

http://franchisewisdom.com/7-eleven-review

Super Size Me said...

Marty, did you try 7-Eleven's Mashed Potato Vending Machine? Is this the healthy food option Margaret Chabris has been speaking about? Is it even potato?

Anonymous said...

For an entertaining (?) 45 seconds check out the article Ken provided a link to above.

Come for the writer's shit logic and cynicism (with a healthy dose of "I got mine" for good measure), stay for the bigot in the comments section.

I do hope he is a volunteer.

Anonymous said...

There is a Subway on Avenue B and one on Houston b/t A and B.

Anonymous said...

The people who shop at 7-Eleven are almost as attractive as the people who shop at Walmart!

Marty Wombacher said...

@Super Size Me: After taking one bite of that "snadwich" I swore I'd never darken the door of another 7-Eleven and I never have! I don't have to worry about them now, Peoria doesn't have any 7-Elevens!

Anonymous said...

Not wanted. Not needed. Tragic. Period. We will keep going to Poppy's Deli--the real thing!

Super Size Me said...

7-Eleven franchise? Think again!

"I truley believe franchising is the biggest scam going. Maybe Bernie Madoff came up with this idea a long time ago? It sounds alot like a sceme he would pull off too."

"Please do not consider 7-11 for your future. No life, once you became a franchisee. You work for them is another big 24 hours headache. Also they control you by all means."

"No benefits, No holidays, No life but just headache. Not worth it…. Our money and their system. Result $10/- an hour. Do not even think about this franchise."

"I wouldn’t recommend buying a 7-Eleven franchise. My reasoning is that they do not allow a franchisee to grow within the system, regardless of having money. the typical ROI is almost 7years on brand new stores, vs Goodwill stores (running stores) it is almost 4-5 years depends on what kind of premium you pay. Back to the growth. I had one store for almost 2 years now. I am now approved to buy one more stores, but what sucks is, what if I want 3 stores or more, too bad so bad, 7-Eleven will not approve that. The approval rate to buy more stores is they say 6 months, but it ends up being 1.5 years. And brand new stores are bad investment, because of unknown sales and the Roi. In conclusion a person does make money, but it is very hard to grow with this business"

www.unhappyfranchisee.com

Anonymous said...

They do have some food items you can't get at a local bodega; like a microwaved egg sandwich.

Anonymous said...

Is this lady for real? The East Village is underserved by convenience stores? She must be blind to anything w/o a corporate logo.
What is 7-11 providing that we cannot already get at one of our local bodegas except Big Gulps and Slurpees (conveniently exempt from Bloombergs soda ban since 7-11 is somehow a grocery store) or that awful greasy food they "cook" and let sit for hours on end- yummy!
Their items are NOT cheaper, in any way shape or form.
Plus, during Hurricane Sandy and the blackout, 7-11 was closed- they did not care about us in the EV. Many of our local bodegas stayed open somehow and someway to provide the things we needed. I will never forget how grateful I felt to get a hot sandwich and real coffee after a few days of no power.
Don't believe the 7-11 hype!!

shmnyc said...

Every post on the Gothamist is the douchiest post! The only thing worse is their Comments section.

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

Margaret Chabris probably hasn't stepped foot outside of Texas, let alone visited NYC or the East Village. Those of us who DO walk down the streets here know is there ZERO need or demand for a 7-Eleven.

She is a talking head and a pretty ridiculous sounding one at that.

Uncle Waltie said...

7-11 is for tourists and NYU kids. NEVER seen any local in any of their stores. Tourists don't know better and NYU kids have yet to learn.

glamma said...

OMG those f*cking bast@rds.
They sell POISONOUS FOOD that is made 95% of chemicals that sits in warehouses for two years - they buy it from the cheapest, most unsustainable and irresponsible producers who DESTROY the planet, abuse and murder animals in the most inhumane and unchecked ways possible, DO NOT PAY FAIR WAGES TO THEIR LABORERS OR DO ANYTHING TO IMPROVE THEIR ABJECT QUALITY OF LIFE/SURVIVAL, come into beautiful communities like OURS and try to DESTROY our community strength by putting mom and pops out of business and taking their place with cold, corporate ruthless profiteering and then, wait for it, CHARGE MORE FOR THOSE ITEMS THAN ALL THE BODEGAS CURRENTLY DO and then have the GALL to say they are doing us a SERVICE???
Hey Margaret - why don't you come down here and try to schpeel your swill face to face with us "poor residents who need 7-11?"
Seriously.
I f*cking dare you to try.

Anonymous said...

everyone should write to that link and give a piece of your mind.
as new yorkers, we really need to stand up right about now.
thanks.