Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Summer's here: Grace's cold borscht has arrived at Polish G. I. Delicatessen



Thanks to Slum Goddess for passing along the sign at the Polish G. I. Delicatessen, where you can sign up for next week's batch of Grace's cold borscht.

The shop is at 109 First Ave. between East Sixth Street and East Seventh Street...

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

They misspelled "borscht" on their own sign.

Anonymous said...

Good news. It's also at Little Poland, Neptune, and the butcher on 2nd Avenue if you miss out at PGI!

Anonymous said...

Funny you should run this notice. I stumbled by on Saturday for some potato salad and cookies and the owner suggested the borscht as my vegetarian option. I was more in the mood for mushroom barley or split pea, but tried the borcht (I suppose this is not a misspelling but the brand name). It was delicious and seems to have shredded carrots in it as well.

Will the lines go out the door like those of all the new foodie places, like Superiority?

I doubt it. So I can have all the delicious borcht (trademark duly noted) I want without those pesky millennials mucking up the sidewalks with their inexorable lines!

Anonymous said...

Actually people, it's "barszcz" !

Anonymous said...

How is this possible? I thought the EV was suburban and bland. This must be a mistake- you cant buy this anywhere in real burbs.

DrGecko said...

The English spelling is a little aleatoric; the dictionaries list several variants. In Polish, it's actually "barszcz" (for real), which doesn't look so appetizing to Americans.

If you don't like their spelling, you can inform them. Please do it politely, so they don't think you're a jerk.

Anonymous said...

I believe the owner is Israeli as well, so maybe that has something to do with the spelling.

Ken from Ken's Kitchen said...

Anxiously awaiting Polish G. I. Delicatessen Cold Borscht Comedy Festival.

DrGecko said...

No, the owners are Grace (Grazyna) and Irene, her sister, and they're both Polish. David works for them, and he's Israeli but originally from Iran (and occasionally wanders over to the Persian restaurant up the block and talks to the people in Farsi).

Criticizing their spelling is a totally douche move.

Anonymous said...

Who cares about the spelling? It's the buttermilk that is the problem. You only add sour cream, NOT buttermilk. Get a dose of reality, people!

Anonymous said...

No. Buttermilk is very common. In fact, Sour cream is more often simply an added garnish.

rnh said...

Israeli? Nothing about anyone in there seems Israeli.

Jay Rommel said...

"there is a borscht recipe for every Polish cook" so I have always used Teresa's Cold Borscht as my own benchmark...they are still out on Montague Street, but were on First Avenue for over 10 years...and so while I think of Veselka as a Playskool Version of what the taste might be, I found the overuse of dill a drawback, and need to continue to Neptune and the Butcher on Second before handing out the Annual Cold Borscht Taste Test Award...which, currently resides in Brooklyn, in memorium to those Summers past.