Monday, July 17, 2017

Montauk Salt Cave coming to 10th Street



The signage is up for Montauk Salt Cave, opening soon on the upper level at 90 E. 10th St. between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue.

Here's more about what they offer via their Facebook page:

Salt therapy is a natural way of healing ailments related to respiratory disease, skin conditions and inflammatory symptoms. You will be surrounded with tons-literally tons of Himalayan salt that is both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. The cave is a beautiful setting for you to come and simply feel better. If you suffer from allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis, COPD or any respiratory illness...you have found the right place.


[Montauk Salt Cave image via Facebook]

The spa has locations in (duh) Montauk as well as Huntington. You can learn more about their business here. Ikinari Steak, where patrons mostly have to eat standing up, is right downstairs. The upstairs space was last leased to Miron Properties.

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

This just makes me want to drink buckets of water.

blue glass said...

in case there is not enough salt on your steak

Anonymous said...

I wonder what medical science they have to back these claims? My guess none.

Anonymous said...

There's actually some research into the benefits of salt air on lung ailments, popular in the Ukraine.

Anonymous said...

Research & Studies
We invite you to learn more about the benefits of the salt room treatment we offer by reviewing the following articles. The studies were carried out by researchers outside of the United States and are not affiliated with the Montauk Salt Cave. https://www.montauksaltcave.com/salt-therapy

Anonymous said...

No mention of who runs it, who the therapists are, or if they're New York licensed therapists or doctors from this statement.

Anonymous said...

Nah Im good, someone gave me one of those salt candles so I'm all cured now.

Anonymous said...

Oh, come on, this is ridiculous. Who is the target clientele for this place? Is this further evidence of "demographic cleansing" of the East Village?

Anonymous said...

heh. What a gimmick. Well there's a sucker born every minute.

Anonymous said...

I wonder what medical science they have to back these claims?

Plenty of medical science to back up the placebo effect; not a tremendous amount of evidence backing up much of what passes for established medical science however.

Anonymous said...

Sorry guys in the era of gullible (look who's President) new age "healing" "cleansing" "cures" just don't wash.

PJ said...

For those who wouldn't consider "slumming" at the well-established Russian Baths...

JQ LLC said...

People with disposable income sure are stupid these days.

Anonymous said...

Let people believe what they want. People still believe in Jesus. That's more bizarre than believing that natural elements heal.

Anonymous said...

Oh ye of little faith. People in Europe have been going to spas for at least two thousand years. A few years ago I found myself in Montecatini in Italy and indulged myself with a mud bath (the mud coming from the volcanoes). Yes, I felt better after a few visits. I know of people who have been to Iceland and gone to the thermal baths (you find thermal baths in many European resort towns). So why not sea salt experiences in the East Village?

Slug said...

As a shell-less terrestrial gastropod mollusc, I am offended.

Anonymous said...

When real estate offices close and salt "caves" open in their place, we may be near end-days!

PS: @9:07am: It's entirely possible that volcanic mud contains minerals such as magnesium that are absorbed through the skin & would actually help one's health. Just breathing in a salt cave, not so much, IMO.

Anonymous said...

But but but, negative ions!!!

Anonymous said...

Full paleo experience. Eat bloody meat on the run and then hang out in a mineral cave.

marjorie said...

Can I get my salt in a hoof, to go? Does it come with a biscuit?

PJ said...

Well, whether the supposed health claims of the places in Europe you mentioned are true or not, those spas are taking advantage of existing geological features. I have relatives who live near Saratoga N.Y. and though I don't believe all the 19th Century hype, I make sure to drink the rotten egg water from the Congress Spring source whenever I am there. Just because.

People did and still do believe in fountains of youth. This thing is entirely too contrived. For crissakes, if you're gonna call it "Montauk Salt Cave", could you at least source your salt in Montauk, L.I. ? Oh, wait, salt from Montauk has no health benefits or something? I am confused. Seem to be missing whatever the point is...

Well, remember the "Oxygen Bar" fad ? Maybe this is more like Kramer from "Seinfeld" inventing a cologne that smelt like the beach...

Pat said...

I used to go to Halo Air in Chelsea which was a similar place and was sorry when they closed. The sessions in the salt room helped me greatly. I breathed better, had a brighter complexion and was elated when I left there (negative ions.) Once I felt like I was coming down with a cold and it went away after I visited the salt room. I researched the history of these treatments. It was noticed that workers in Russian salt mines were denied most medical care but did not suffer from respiratory ailments. They began taking patients into the old abandoned mines to benefit their lungs. Salt spas are popular in Russia, Europe and Israel. They are way ahead of America in this respect. I am happy to see a place open in Manhattan and hope I can visit it soon. I don't work for this place or get anything from them for this post. If it seems exotic to anyone, so be it, but it has nothing to do with yuppies or gentrification or any of that.

Isolde said...

I hope they got an engineer in to make sure the floors/walls can bear the weight of the salt.....