Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Report: LPC wants some revisions to the proposed condoplex for 2nd Avenue and 7th Street

The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) reviewed the proposal yesterday to erect a 7-story condoplex on the Second Avenue gas explosion site at Seventh Street.

The 21-unit conodplex with retail space reportedly isn't too far off from what the LPC will approve. Here's part of the coverage via 6sqft:

After reviewing the plans ... and deciding that the proposal is “close, but not quite there,” they’ve sent [architect Morros] Adjmi and Yaniv Shaky Cohen’s Nexus Building Development Group back to the drawing board over concerns regarding the windows, storefront, and coloring. Neighbors and those affected by the tragedy are also calling for a commemorative plaque to be incorporated into the design.

And about a way to commemorate the two men who died in the explosion — Moises Ismael Locon, 27, and Nicholas Figueroa, 23:

[T]he one thing everyone seemed to agree on is the necessity for a commemorative plaque. Adjmi said the owner originally considered a tree to serve as a marker, but the LPC would like to see him work with the community on this addition.

The lot sits within the the East Village/Lower East Side Historic District, and requires the LPC's approval to move forward.

Read more from yesterday at Curbed.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Exclusive: 2nd Avenue explosion sites have a new owner

Dedicating Moises Locón Way and Nicholas Figueroa Way on 2nd Avenue at 7th Street

Soil testing underway at the 2nd Avenue explosion site

Here's the 1st look at the new building proposed for the 2nd Avenue explosion site

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ooh, ONE tree - how cheap of them! Not even one tree for each life lost??

blue glass said...

it is too bad that the vote was only about the color of the brick and how it fits into a landmarked district.
it's also too bad that landmarking does not mean preservation. one only has to look around manhattan to see the movie stage-set nature of the attempt to recreate what has been (and will soon be) torn down.

i had hoped that the families of the two men that died in the 7th street explosion would have settled their lawsuits before any owner or developer could build. and i also would have hoped that charges against the previous owners would have been adjudicated before allowing them to sell the now more valuable vacant property.

Anonymous said...

"A plaque"

Fuck these people. The whole site should be a memorial park.

Anonymous said...

Windows, really?

Giovanni said...

By “the coloring” they must mean any sickly color that reminds you of baby’s vomit.

Gojira said...

Those buildings were made of that lovely, warm, weathered red brick with white accents. Why not try to recreate the facade at least somewhat?

JQ LLC said...

There should be a plaque commemorating/disgracing the bastards who blew up the building and the criminal owners who enabled the pennypinching illegal gas hookups and to the useless and bought off D.O.B. that didn't do enough to curb their willful malfeasance. Complete with profanities.

That building should have been all real affordable and rent-stabilized apts. It will be a foreign oligarch spoiled infantile progeny's playground instead.

https://impunitycity.wordpress.com/ Your goddamn city.

Anonymous said...

Even though its a good idea, this location will never be a memorial It won't simply because the space is worth millions of dollars and it just cant idly sit there for years as a graveyard or symbol for what was lost. Look at 9/11. There is still a memorial, yet the Freedom Tower was built on top of the land where thousands of lives were lost. Perhaps the space in between where the new building will go would be nice. It could include trees, a plaque and few benches?

I am just thinking out loud here. I live on 7th street and cross this intersection each day. There isn't a time where I don't think about those two young men who lost their lives or the many who lost homes. Having the space just sit there, unattended to, with weeds growing everywhere, and makeshift gravestones seems sad and unsettling. It has been three years now. There has to be a way where everyone can possibly benefit from this, including the family. Doing nothing to the site is just a grim reminder.