Showing posts with label St. Brigid School. Show all posts
Showing posts with label St. Brigid School. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 1, 2022

City has unvaccinated educators doing remote learning now from the former St. Brigid School

A handful of NYC public school teachers who received medical or religious exemptions to the city's COVID-19 vaccine mandate are now working remotely from the former St Brigid School on Avenue B and Seventh Street. 

Yesterday was the first day of teaching remote classes from here. EVG contributor Stacie Joy confirmed the use of the space during a brief visit to the school, where masking is mandatory. 

A source on site said the Department of Education (DOE) would be using the building until the school year ends in June. It was not immediately known how many teachers were working at the St. Brigid site. Stacie spotted at least 20 employees, including custodial and security. (By the end of last September, the DOE had granted medical and religious exemptions to 530 staff members, the Daily News reported. The teachers had previously been working from home, sources said.)

One teacher, spotted leaving the building, declined to comment on how the first day went. 

As previously reported, city workers — including teachers, supervisors, and school staff members — were told they will be fired if they do not either get the vaccine by Feb. 14 or agree to remain on leave without pay and drop their objection to the policy. (Last month, the Supreme Court denied a request from a group of NYC teachers seeking to block a vaccine mandate for employees who were not given a religious exemption, per NBC News on Feb. 11.)

According to CBS News on Feb. 15: "The 1,430 workers who lost their jobs represent less than 1% of the 370,000-person city workforce and the number of terminations was far fewer than expected before the ... deadline to get the shots." 

Late last year, interior renovations began at the school on the NE corner of Seventh and B, prompting speculation about what might be next for the building.

In February 2019, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of that academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents and faculty alike. Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese in 2019. 

Given its A-plus EV location with Tompkins Square Park views, some residents have figured this property would end up a high-end residential complex much like the former Mary Help of Christians on Avenue A and 12th Street. 

Thursday, December 30, 2021

Brownout at the former St. Brigid School

Work continues at the former St. Brigid School on the NE corner of Avenue B and Seventh Street.

EVG reader Robert Miner reports that workers painted the former school's green strip brown on Sunday.

And yesterday...
... workers removed the St. Brigid's banners from out front...
In February 2019, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of that academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents and faculty alike. Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese in 2019. 

Given its A-plus EV location with Tompkins Square Park views, some residents have figured this property would end up a high-end condoplex much like the former Mary Help of Christians on Avenue A and 12th Street. 

However, as Dave on 7th pointed out, the work here suggests that the Archdiocese is prepping the two-level building for rental for another school (perhaps a charter school?). 

A corner to watch in 2022!

Thursday, December 23, 2021

Activity at the former St. Brigid School on Avenue B and 7th Street

The St. Brigid School on Avenue B and Seventh Street has sat empty for two-plus years, ever since classes ended for the summer in June 2019.

As we first reported in February 2019, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of the current academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents, and faculty alike. Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.

Nearby residents are curious about what might happen to the two-level building and subsequent property — prime East Village real estate with views of Tompkins Square Park.

EVG reader Robert Miner recently saw workers removing classroom furniture during the day... with a crew painting the interior in the evening... 
Per Robert: "Not sure if they're sprucing it up for sale or a reopening — but at least it's unlikely they're moving towards demolition if they're putting in this effort."

There's nothing on file with the Department of Buildings indication any future development here. 

The Archdiocese has seen sales of more than $80 million for two former East Village churches in recent years.

Developer Douglas Steiner bought the former Mary Help of Christians property on Avenue A at 12th Street in 2012 from the Archdiocese of New York for $41 million. During the summer of 2013, workers demolished the church, school and rectory to make way for Steiner East Village, the block-long condoplex.

In March 2020, Gemini Rosemont, an L.A.-based real-estate investor, bought the former Church of the Nativity property on Second Avenue between Second Street and Third Street for $40 million. 

The Church of St. Brigid-St. Emeric (and the rectory) remain in use next door. The church was spared from the wrecking ball, reopening in January 2013 after a renovation.

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Mystery dig behind the St. Brigid School



Excavation work started this week behind the now-closed St. Brigid School on Seventh Street and Avenue B...



... and as seen from the Eighth Street side... well, as Dave on 7th points out ...



... there's a screen up to prevent any blog snooping...



The appearance of a mini excavator and dump truck isn't always newsworthy... however, in the case of this property, there has been speculation over what will become of the former elementary school, prime real estate with Tompkins Square Park views.

In February 2019, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of the 2018-2019 academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents and faculty alike.

Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.

To date, the Archdiocese has not stated its plans for the space.

In recent years, the Archdiocese has seen sales of more than $80 million for two former East Village churches.

Developer Douglas Steiner bought the former Mary Help of Christians property on Avenue A at 12th Street in 2012 from the Archdiocese of New York for $41 million. During the summer of 2013, workers demolished the church, school and rectory to make way for Steiner East Village, the block-long condoplex.

Back in March, Gemini Rosemont, an L.A.-based real-estate investor, bought the former Church of the Nativity property on Second Avenue between Second Street and Third Street for $40 million.

Monday, June 24, 2019

Permanent vacation now for the St. Brigid School



Classes ended for the summer last week at the St. Brigid School on Avenue B and Seventh Street.

As we first reported in early February, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of the current academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents and faculty alike. According to one parent: "Kids sent home crying with a letter to their parent/guardian. School being closed by the Archdiocese without warning."

Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.

Despite the Archdiocese’s best efforts to maintain the operational and financial viability of the school, continuing to educate students in a building that is underutilized and in need significant improvements has proven unfeasible.

St. Brigid School students will have the opportunity to continue their Catholic education at another nearby Catholic School...

Stunned parents took action, launching a Twitter account and a Facebook group and petition ... as well as organizing a town hall to ask for more transparency about this decision.

Joseph Zwilling, a spokesperson for the Archdiocese, told the Post in an article on Feb. 9 that the school did have money left in its endowment fund — about $1.5 million. He also said the school was losing $850,000 a year. "It is a sad reality that it is nearly impossible to run a school with only 119 students in Grades K-8," he said.

We haven't heard anything else about the school's closure since late February. There aren't any updated messages (other than the initial announcement from February) on the school's website about the permanent closure ... and the social media accounts launched after news of the closing broke have been dormant since late February.



For now, no word on what the Archdiocese has planned for this prime corner real estate that overlooks Tompkins Square Park...



Previously on EV Grieve:
Report: What happened to the donated money earmarked for St. Brigid School?

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Report: What happened to the donated money earmarked for St. Brigid School?



As noted on Friday, students, parents and local residents will gather this morning — at a mass at 10 or afterwards at the school — to show "support and solidarity in saving our beloved school."

This past Monday, the Archdiocese of New York took the community by surprise in announcing the school will close here on Seventh Street and Avenue B at the end of this academic year. (St. Brigid is one of seven NYC Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.)

Meanwhile, parents and residents are now questioning where the money is from the anonymous donation that spared St. Brigid Church from demolition. As reported at the time in 2008:

"The donor also has given $2 million to establish an endowment to help the parish meet the spiritual needs of community residents. A separate gift of $8 million will support Saint Brigid School, and other Catholic schools in need."

To the Post today:

"There still was a significant amount of money left," said Edwin Torres, who formed an organization to save the church.

He said the cash went to the Archdiocese and there should have been at least $2 million for the school.

"They really haven’t shown an accounting for that," he said.

And the response from the Archdiocese of New York:

Joseph Zwilling, an Archdiocese spokesman, told the Post the school did have money left in its endowment fund — about $1.5 million.

But he said the school is losing $850,000 a year, a loss the Archdiocese has been covering.

"It is a sad reality that it is nearly impossible to run a school with only 119 students in Grades K-8," Zwilling said.

And the response from a parent:

Matthew Daloisio, a St. Brigid parent working to save the school, said the $1.5 million was "absolutely a lot of money" and parents would work to boost enrollment if that would keep the doors open.

"Then with our help, there should be no reason the school can't stay open," he said.

There is also a petition in circulation (link here) to help save the school.

And here's a look at some of the homemade signs that line the school...



















Friday, February 8, 2019

A mass Sunday to show support for St. Brigid School



Flyers are up around the neighborhood about a mass Sunday morning at 10 at the Church of St. Brigid-St. Emeric on Avenue B at Eighth Street.

Per the sign: "Please join us as we gather to show the Church & School & Community our support and solidarity in saving our beloved school."

As first reported here, stunned students and parents learned Monday that the Archdiocese of New York will close the school on Seventh Street and Avenue B at the end of this academic year. (St. Brigid is one of seven NYC Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.)

Parents were especially upset with how the Archdiocese relayed the news. Said one St. Brigid parent: "Receiving a letter home in a kid's backpack, like it was a field trip permission slip, is unacceptable. It gave no concrete reasons but claims that they did their best to keep the school open. It is not 'your best' if you did not include the community most affected."

After the mass on Sunday, interested parents will gather for a planning meeting.

Parents have already created a Twitter account — @BrigidSave ... and a Facebook group.



Thanks to Steven for the photos!

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

The Archdiocese of New York is shutting down the St. Brigid School on Avenue B and 7th Street



St. Brigid School, which was founded in 1856, will close at the end of this school year, stunned students, parents and teachers learned yesterday.

Said one: "Kids sent home crying with a letter to their parent/guardian. School being closed by the Archdiocese without warning." Another parent told me this via Facebook: "The school said they had no idea. Teachers and the administration are distraught and so sad ... such a good and well-kept school. Hard to believe."

Here's the announcement on the school's website:

On Feb. 4, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School in Manhattan will cease operations at the end of the current academic year.

We understand that this is upsetting and concerning news, but rest assured that additional information on this development, as well as the resources to ensure that your child can continue their education at an excellent Catholic School nearby, will be forthcoming this week and posted on a special web page we have created for parents: https://catholicschoolsny.org/st-brigid, where additional information and resources will be available and updated regularly.

Here's what the Archdiocese posted:

On February 4, the Archdiocese of New York announced changes to a number of Catholic schools across the Archdiocese. Regretfully, St. Brigid School will cease operations at the end of the current academic year.

Despite the Archdiocese’s best efforts to maintain the operational and financial viability of the school, continuing to educate students in a building that is underutilized and in need significant improvements has proven unfeasible.

St. Brigid School students will have the opportunity to continue their Catholic education at another nearby Catholic School, some of which are listed below. We encourage you to visit potential schools at your earliest convenience to see how your child can continue receiving an excellent faith-based education.

• Guardian Angel Elementary School
• Immaculate Conception Elementary School
• Our Lady of Pompeii Elementary School
• Transfiguration Elementary School

Only one of those schools, Immaculate Conception, is in the East Village.

St. Brigid, located on Avenue B at Seventh Street (prime spot for condos some day), serves students from nursery school through 8th grade.

St. Brigid's Roman Catholic Church on Avenue B at Eighth Street was nearly demolished in 2006, but an unknown donor put up the money ($20 million) to renovate the historic structure. The church reopened in January 2013.

Updated 10 a.m.

School parents are organizing ... and they want to know more about the decision to close St. Brigid.



Said one parent in the comments:

Receiving a letter home in a kid's backpack, like it was a field trip permission slip, is unacceptable. It gave no concrete reasons but claims that they did their best to keep the school open. It is not 'your best' if you did not include the community most affected. The families are not naive, but they are getting organized!

There is a Twitter account now — @BrigidSave ... and a Facebook group.

Updated 5 p.m.

The Post followed up on the story, talking to students and parents...

Heartsick students at a 163-year-old Manhattan Catholic school burst into tears Monday after learning it would shutter permanently at the end of this academic year.

Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School in the East Village was one of five city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese of New York this week.

“They told us during assembly,” said a downcast Carly Auringer, an 11-year-old sixth-grader. “Everyone was crying.”

Students said they had formed rare bonds with classmates over the years — and struggled to accept being separated from them next year.

Image via Google Street View