Showing posts with label Community Board 3. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Community Board 3. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

Community Board 3 adds a special meeting on congestion pricing to June's agenda

3rd Avenue photo by deberarr 

Community Board 3 has added a special meeting this month to address Gov. Hochul's decision to indefinitely pause congestion pricing, which was set to go into effect at the end of June. 

Here's more via an email from CB3 Chair Andrea Gordillo: 
Community Boards 1-6 have discussed signing on to a letter to all parties involved with the MTA's Congestion Pricing Plan, asking to reverse course on the Governor's decision. Given the unprecedented nature of the abrupt policy shift, its potential cost to the MTA, and public trust in government, Community Board 3 will convene this special meeting after the public session of its June Full Board meeting to discuss and vote on the contents of the letter which would ask the Governor to proceed with congestion pricing. 

We encourage members of the public to attend the meeting and sign up to give public comment, and we ask for your support in reaching out to our communities to inform them of the opportunity to comment on this important decision. 
The full CB3 meeting is Tuesday, June 25, at P.S. 20, 166 Essex St., between Houston and Stanton. 

The item was also added to tonight's (June 11) meeting of CB3's Transportation, Public Safety, Sanitation, and Environment Committee. 

Per Gordillo's email: "This decision to add this to the agenda after the agenda was posted, while also unprecedented, was made to ensure the broadest base of public comment, and exceptions like this are not to be granted again." 

Tonight's hybrid committee meeting starts at 6:30 at the CB3 office, 59 E. Fourth St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery. Limited seating is available to the first 15 people. Members of the public can also attend by Zoom here

In a statement last Wednesday, Hochul expressed concerns about the timing and state of the city's post-pandemic recovery. 

Under the congestion-pricing plan, most people driving passenger vehicles into Manhattan below 60th Street would need to pay a minimum of $15, with larger vehicles incurring higher charges. 

The MTA has already spent tens of millions of dollars to install cameras, sensors, license plate readers, and other equipment on city roadways in preparation for the plan's launch. The anticipated fee was projected to generate around $1 billion annually, benefiting subway and bus systems that serve approximately 4 million daily riders. 

The move also represents a dramatic reversal for public transit advocates, who had supported congestion pricing to raise money for NYC's struggling subway and commuter rail systems and reduce traffic on city streets.

Wednesday, February 28, 2024

You can watch last night's Community Board 3 meeting right here

Several people have asked us about last night's full Community Board 3 meeting at P.S. 20, in which Zach Iscol, commissioner of the NYC Emergency Management, provided an update on the agency's asylum-seeker operations and community engagement efforts on Seventh Street and Avenue B. (We wrote about the meeting here and here.)

We embedded the video of the meeting below. Iscol starts speaking (and answering questions) at the 23-minute mark...

 

Thursday, February 22, 2024

Addressing the asylum seeker crisis; city to update Community Board 3 next week

Photos and reporting by Stacie Joy

On Feb. 9, a few dozen city administrators, local elected officials and community leaders came together for a 90-minute meeting to discuss the ongoing crisis of serving asylum seekers at the former St. Brigid School.

The gathering occurred before a public meeting that Community Board 3 is hosting this Tuesday evening, Feb. 27. More about that session is below.

Dustin Ridener, special projects administrator for NYC Emergency Management (NYCEM), described the Feb. 9 get-together as a "small, focused gathering of invited advocates and stakeholders [that] aims to explore collaborative strategies with the community to enhance the support provided to asylum seekers, [to] find more effective and meaningful ways to assist New York City's newest arrivals." 

There were few clear takeaways in the end, though many of the invited had opinions on what has been taking place the last nine months on the corner of Seventh Street and Avenue B and the immediate area. St. Brigid served as a respite center for asylum seekers for several months last year. Starting in October, the facility has been used as a reticketing center — the only one in the city

Since then, the situation here is only getting worse,  as more and more asylum seekers are reaching their 30-day limits at shelters across New York City, and they line up in the cold outside St. Brigid so they can be placed back into new shelters. (We outlined the challenges here.)

NYCEM Commissioner (and East Village resident) Zach Iscol stated that they want to change the narrative "from people in need to people we need." 

"What can be done in the East Village [can] provide a model on how things are done," he said.

Mammad Mahmoodi, co-founder of East Village Loves NYC, the nonprofit that provides food and resources to people in need, including asylum seekers, suggested a name change from a reticketing center, "as it does everything except reticket."

He said EV Loves NYC has been providing 2,000 meals three times a week to asylum seekers, and that Trinity Lower East Side on Ninth Street and Avenue B has been providing 600 meals every weekday — and that no one has received funding.

EV Loves NYC co-founder Sasha Allenby brought up clothing and warming centers, especially for female asylum seekers with no hats, gloves, shoes, or warm clothing. She asked about attention for at-risk populations, people who are "literally freezing." 

The group discussed putting a system in place to identify needs and supply specific items to those folks, but no concrete plans were made.
Another point of conversation: porta potties.

As we first reported on Jan. 9, the city removed the three portable toilets from Tompkins Square Park. The porta potties were in poor shape and had been vandalized, and officials figured the same thing would happen to any replacements.

For the last month and a half, anyone who needs to use a restroom while in Tompkins has been relieving themselves in and around the park.

Paul D'Amore, chief of operations of the Department of Parks & Recreation in Manhattan, told the group that "no decision on porta potties will be made until the spring." Several people made clear there was a need for them, prompting D'Amore and Deputy Chief of Operations Ralph Musolino to agree to discuss the issue and get back to the group. 

The NYCEM pointed out that seven additional portable toilets were brought into the courtyard behind St. Brigid's and that any asylum seeker with a wristband can use them if accompanied to the area by a security escort from the facility. (We checked in with people in line at St. Brigid on the way home from the meeting and learned there were mixed messages about these toilets. Some people reported being able to access the facilities, while others said they could not.) 

The meeting concluded with a plan to reconvene to discuss the next steps. 

Afterward, EV Loves NYC's Sasha Allenby told us, "It was good to highlight the issues, but we really need to focus more on the solutions to them."

She continued: "An easy starting point would be the porta potties in the park. These are a legal requirement and should be an easily solvable issue. We also need real action on the vulnerability of the single women who are arriving."

NYCEM to address Community Board 3 

On Tuesday evening, NYCEM's Commissioner Zach Iscol "will update the community on the agency's asylum-seeker operations and community engagement efforts within the confines of CB3," per the meeting invite.
Iscol is expected to speak at 7 p.m. Only board members can ask questions at the meeting, but residents may submit questions via email by tomorrow (Feb. 23) for Iscol to address. 

The meeting will be in person at PS 20, 166 Essex St. at Houston, and streamed on YouTube here.  

Previously on EV Grieve: 

Tuesday, November 7, 2023

A primer on Community Board 3's role in the permit process for legal cannabis shops

Photo and reporting by Stacie Joy
50 Avenue A, home to a proposed new cannabis-related business

If you follow the monthly Community Board 3 meetings list, you likely noticed a new category — the Cannabis Control Task Force.

On Oct. 4, the New York State Office of Cannabis Management (OCM) opened up AU, or Adult Usage, licensing and permitting to sell cannabis in retail stores in NYC to the public. 

As The City noted: "Under the state's 2021 law, a retail applicant must notify their local community board at least 30 days before submitting their application to the state and identify their proposed business location. But that provision was barely noticed until now because retail licenses had previously been limited to justice-impacted individuals whose store locations were provided by the state."

Now, community boards, including CB3, get the applications first. The local boards are tasked with providing recommendations for new licenses, and according to published reports, they are being overwhelmed by the process.

In November, the CB3 task force is meeting on two evenings — Nov. 9 (at the Houston Street Center, Double Classrooms 2 & 3 — 273 Bowery) and Nov. 13 (The Clemente Soto Velez Cultural and Educational Center, 107 Suffolk St.).

With 20-plus applicants on the docket this month, we asked CB3 District Manager Susan Stetzer questions about the process and the community and the Board's role in the applications.

"This process is labor intensive, and we are not receiving much guidance from the state," Stetzer said. "We've requested a 30-day extension for each application, as we won't have time to complete each one within the State's required 30-day turnaround period. No one has sat down with us to ask us what we need."

The following responses were condensed for length and clarity.

Why are so many cannabis applications now going before the Community Board? 

OCM has a three-month window for applications right now, and it's a lottery system, so maybe there is a rush and some multiple applications. Also, there is a minimum 1,000-feet-apart rule, so once one location is pulled, no one else nearby can be accepted. Since this is a lottery system, it's not drawn in order of application.

Is this a similar role to liquor licenses? 

No, we wish it were! The State Liquor Authority application process has been honed, streamlined, and refined over the years. For example, the applications have landlord, contact names, and phone numbers listed, and these do not. So we don't have a direct contact. And we don't have much in the way of guidance. 

And why are there so many cannabis applicants?

We have an easier time of it. Community Board 2 [which covers Soho, Noho, Greenwich Village, and the West Village] has 70 applicants, and another Community Board has 90 applicants. 

Will this be a monthly process? 

This will last for three months as there is a three-month window for applicants to apply to OCM.

Is CB3 going to form a new committee for this? 

This newly formed committee has previously heard Conditional Adult-Use Retail Dispensaries licensing; these new applications are for adult recreational usage. 

What part does the Community Board play in this new field? 

 We don’t know! 

What are the presentations that the applicants put together? 

The questionnaires are posted on the CB3 website [link here] so people can read them and attend the meetings to ask questions. 

Why are there two separate groups/dates/locations? 

They are grouped by location — east and west sides of the CB3 area. We did this to make it easier for the residents who live in those areas.

Does order of appearance have any significance? 

No. Mostly, they were grouped by address, but the order of appearance can change. We try to accommodate people's schedules, which can change at the last minute and lead to order shuffling. 

What part does restorative justice play in these applications? 

None. This is separate from CAURD justice-impacted licensing. 

Why are there multiple license requests from the same listed address? 

Not sure. The rules don't specify anything about location or lease before coming to the community board.

Are these in-person meetings only? No zoom access? 

 The locations available don't have hybrid services. No resources or equipment for Zoom. One has a cut-off time of 9:30 p.m. and the other 10:30 p.m., so we hope we can get to all the applicants listed.  

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You can join CB3's mailing list via this link.

Tuesday, January 17, 2023

On the CB3-SLA docket tonight: fresh bread, vinyl records and the members-only FlyFish Club

Here's a look at some of the applicants who will appear before Community Board 3's SLA committee this evening. (See below for info on watching online.) It's a light agenda this month, with just a handful of applications for new liquor licenses. 

Heaven's Cookies LLC, 47 2nd Ave (wb)

The team behind Sauced, a wine bar that plays vinyl records on Bedford Avenue in Williamsburg, is planning a like-minded concept for a currently vacant and under-renovation storefront on Second Avenue between Second Street and Third Street (pictured above).

Sauced Grocery is a combo deli-bakery-cafe that will serve deli sandwiches and baked bread during the day with a wine bar in the evenings. There will also be "a vinyl records listening room." Proposed hours are from noon to midnight, with a 2 a.m. close Thursday through Saturday.

You can find more details on the Sauced questionnaire here.

Francis Kite (Francis Kite LLC), 40 Ave C (op) 

The Francis Kite Club is being billed as "a collectively built space created for sociality, leisure, collaboration, debate, conversation, and play" for the storefront at 40 Avenue C between Third Street and Fourth Street.

The space, which will operate a cafe, plans to host "art events such as lectures, exhibitions and performances" several times a month.

No. 40 has been used as a pop-up theater space this past year... the address was previously the cocktail lounge Bedlam.

Find the Francis Kite questionnaire here

FlyFish Club (D&C Social Club Inc), 141 E Houston St (op)

As reported in November, the city's first NFT restaurant signed on at the new 9-story office building at 141 E. Houston St. between Eldridge and Forsyth. 

According to the Post, the Flyfish Club is leasing three levels, 11,000 square feet total, for the members-only club that will feature a "bustling" cocktail lounge, an upstairs restaurant and outdoor space — the enclosed walkway between the building and Yonah Schimmel next door.

The 84-page questionnaire provides a lot of background, including a sound study and sample menu. Find the PDF here.

NGE NYC LLC, 308 E 6th St (op) 

The management behind the Tim Burton-inspired bar-restaurant Beetle House on Sixth Street between First Avenue and Second Avenue is behind Bread & Stone. This pizzeria will also offer a variety of baked bread.

They plan on operating a "small-batch bread shop" during the day and a restaurant in the evenings, featuring a menu of Italian classics. You can find a sample menu and more details about the proposed business here.

 ---------- 

The CB3 SLA agenda also includes this item of interest: "Develop guidance regarding Open Restaurants hours."

Tonight's meeting starts at 6:30. Find the Zoom invite at this link.

Friday, September 9, 2022

CB3 wants your input on 2023 budget priorities

 Community Board 3 shared this information...

What parks need reconstruction? What programs need funding? Help us assess the needs of our community. 

Every year the Community Board submits a list of capital and expense budget priorities to city agencies. This hearing is your opportunity to have input into these district budget priorities. Tell us how money should be spent within Community Board 3. 

Organizations, groups and individuals representing all segments of the community are encouraged to participate. 

CB 3 Public Hearing — Fiscal Year 2024 Budget Priorities 
Wednesday, Sept. 14 at 6:30 p.m. 

Click here to register for the Zoom meeting. (You must register to attend this Zoom meeting.)

Monday, June 28, 2021

Community Board 3 returns to in-person meetings starting in July

After nearly 15 months of virtual gatherings, Community Board 3 announced the return of in-person meetings starting in July.

Here's part of CB3's email from late last week:
The Executive Order allowing remote meetings has expired and the Governor is not renewing the order. The state Open Government law does not allow us to continue remote meetings after [June 25]. Meetings must be fully in-person; teleconferencing is not allowed. There cannot be "hybrid" meetings.

There has been and will continue to be lobbying to have the state legislature pass legislation to allow hybrid meetings, but this will not happen soon. We are working on finding locations for in-person meetings starting with the first July meeting.
You can find the list of July meetings here. The previous CB3 meetings, both full board and committee, are archived on YouTube here.  

Friday, April 16, 2021

A campaign to help 'Clean Up' CB3

On Tuesday night, flyers arrived around the neighborhood announcing that it was time to "Clean Up" the local Community Board, CB3, and remove Susan Stetzer, the longtime district manager...
The arrival of the flyers coincides with a newly launched website, which among other claims, states: "The concentration of power at CB3 has effectively silenced citizens, stifled public participation, prevented a diversity of views, and stopped real progress and representation from happening." 

The group is going by the Clean Up CB3 Community Commission. Their solution?
The local community boards must be reformed and remade into activist governing boards who actively work to influence policy development not push blatantly partisan political agendas, pursue personal agendas, or give special interest "community" cover. 
When asked to comment on the group's flyers and website, Stetzer said in an email: "One can't engage productively when people are anonymous." 

This isn't the first time that Stetzer has been the subject of a flyer campaign. In September 2012, flyers appeared around the East Village and Lower East Side accusing Stetzer of being an "assassin of New York's creativity" who is "wanted for assault on our civil liberties." In the past, she has been accused of being anti-nightlife. 

As for CB3 drama ... most recently, in January, 16 community groups and block associations within CB3 signed an open letter to local and state officials requesting an inquiry into the recent removal of Alexandra Militano and Carolyn Ratcliffe as chairs of the SLA Committee and Arts & Culture Sub-Committee.

Photos by Stacie Joy

Monday, September 14, 2020

CB3 wants your input on 2021 budget priorities

 Community Board 3 shared this information...

What parks need reconstruction? What programs need funding? Help us assess the needs of our community.

Every year the Community Board submits a list of capital and expense budget priorities to city agencies. This hearing is your opportunity to have input into these district budget priorities. Tell us how money should be spent in Community Board 3.

Organizations, groups, and individuals representing all segments of the community are encouraged to participate.

CB 3 Public Hearing — FY 2022 Budget Priorities
Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 6:30 p.m.
Online: https://zoom.us/j/94839426844
By Phone:  +1 646 518 9805, +1 929 205 6099
Meeting ID:  948 3942 6844

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Deadline extended to apply to serve on a Community Board

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer's office has extended the application period for the 2020-2022 class of Manhattan Community Board members.

You now have until Feb. 14 to apply. Here's another look at the info:

Interested in what gets built in your community and how government works to deliver services in your neighborhood? Apply to join one of Manhattan's 12 Community Boards.

Every Community Board has 50 seats which are filled for two-year terms by volunteers, who are selected by the Borough President and local City Council members. Half the seats are up for appointment or reappointment every year.

Community Boards get a seat at the table in high-stakes land use, real estate, and zoning negotiations, and they work directly with city agencies to influence how government services are delivered at the neighborhood level.

If you'd like to serve as a member of your Community Board, apply online here! Community Board applications will be open until 5 p.m. on Feb. 14.

Physical applications (downloadable here as a PDF) may also be dropped off at the Manhattan Borough President’s Office or mailed and postmarked by Feb. 14, but online submissions are strongly preferred.

You can find more details about our local board — Community Board 3 — via this link.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

So you want to serve on your local Community Board



Application season continues for the 2020-2022 class of Manhattan Community Board members. So this is your chance to be part of your local Community Board (CB3!).

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer's office sent out a notice yesterday about the applications, which are due Jan. 21. Per the EVG inbox:

Interested in what gets built in your community and how government works to deliver services in your neighborhood? Apply to join one of Manhattan's 12 Community Boards.

Every Community Board has 50 seats which are filled for two-year terms by volunteers, who are selected by the Borough President and local City Council members. Half the seats are up for appointment or reappointment every year.

Community Boards get a seat at the table in high-stakes land use, real estate, and zoning negotiations, and they work directly with city agencies to influence how government services are delivered at the neighborhood level.

If you'd like to serve as a member of your Community Board, apply online here! Community Board applications will be open until 5 p.m. on Jan. 21.

Physical applications (downloadable here as a PDF) may also be dropped off at the Manhattan Borough President’s Office or mailed and postmarked by Jan. 21, but online submissions are strongly preferred.

Brewer's office said that CB appointments will be announced at the end of March.

Previously on EV Grieve:
The community board-State Liquor Authority drinking game

Friday, January 18, 2019

Reminders: Here's how you can apply to be a Community Board member



Application season continues for the 2019-2021 class of Manhattan Community Board members (it started in early December). So this is your your chance to be part of your local Community Board (CB3!).

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer's office sent out a reminder yesterday about the applications, which are due Feb. 8. Per the EVG inbox:

Interested in what gets built in your community and how government works to deliver services in your neighborhood? Apply to join one of Manhattan's 12 Community Boards.

Every Community Board has 50 seats which are filled for two-year terms by volunteers, who are selected by the Borough President and local City Council members. Half the seats are up for appointment or reappointment every year.

Community Boards get a seat at the table in high-stakes land use, real estate, and zoning negotiations, and they work directly with city agencies to influence how government services are delivered at the neighborhood level.

If you'd like to serve as a member of your Community Board, apply online here! You can also print the application and drop it off by mail or in-person. The deadline is Feb. 8, 2019.

Per the application: "Community board members must live, work, go to school or have some other significant interest in the community board in which they want to serve."

Back in November, voters said "yes" to Proposal 3, which imposes term limits for the volunteers who sit on Community Boards.

Previously on EV Grieve:
The community board-State Liquor Authority drinking game

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

All 3 NYC ballot measures approved yesterday


[Photo on 1st Avenue yesterday by Peter Brownscombe]

Voters yesterday approved three proposals that came via the Charter Review Commission

As a recap about what they are:

Proposal 1: Campaign Finance

This proposal would lower the amount that a candidate for city office may accept from a contributor to their campaign, increase the amount of public funds available to participating candidates, and make public funds available earlier. Candidates in the 2021 election would have the choice of whether or not to have the new limits apply to them.

Proposal 2: Civic Engagement Commission

This proposal would create a Civic Engagement Commission that would centralize civic engagement initiatives, create a citywide participatory budgeting program, assist community boards, and provide language interpreters throughout the city on Election Day.

Proposal 3: Community Boards

This proposal would change how community boards throughout the city are run, by imposing term limits on appointees, changing the application and appointment process for community board members, and require the Civic Engagement Commission (if Question 2 is approved) to provide resources to community boards.

Per NY1:

Eighty percent of New Yorkers voted "yes" on the first proposal, which cuts the maximum amount of campaign contributions allowed for candidates running for city office.

The second would create a civic engagement commission, which would also allow residents to vote on how to spend city funds.

It won approval by 65 percent of voters.

And 72 percent of voters said "yes" to the last provision.

It would apply term limits to members of the city's 59 community boards.



You can find a full list of the Election Day results for New York here.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Do you have what it takes to be a member of the Community Board? (Well?)


Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer has launched the recruiting process to fill open positions on local Community Boards.

A few details via Brewer's office:

Community Board members must live, work, or have an otherwise significant interest in the neighborhoods served by the community board, and be a New York City resident. In addition, the Manhattan Borough President’s office looks for applicants with histories of involvement in their communities, expertise and skill sets that are helpful to community boards, attendance at community board meetings, and knowledge of issues impacting their community. No more than 25 percent of the members of any board may be New York City employees.

You must also be able to keep a straight face when applicants claim that they only want a liquor license to have something to pair with their desserts.

You can fill out an application online here. The application deadline is Feb. 3.

As The Lo-Down aptly noted: "One suggestion. If you’re interested in joining your local community board, it’s a really good idea so sit through a meeting (these meetings are often not for the faint of heart)." Good times! Check out CB3's December meeting rundown here.

Previously on EV Grieve:
The community board-State Liquor Authority drinking game

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Oh rats: CB3 reportedly tops in Manhattan for vermin

Community Board 12, which covers Washington Heights and Inwood, no longer has the worst rat problem in Manhattan, according to DNAinfo.

Per DNAinfo, the new honor goes to:

Community District 3 — which covers the Lower East Side, East Village and parts of Chinatown — earned the new No. 1 ranking for 2015, the Health Department said.

Well, I didn't see this report online just yet... The department reportedly ranks districts "based on measures of active rat signs, such as fresh tracks, droppings, holes and gnaw marks." (Mmmmmmm)

Anyway, you are welcome CB12!

Photo in Tompkins Square Park by Derek Berg

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

[Updated] Gigi Li elected to 3rd term as Community Board 3 chair


[At tonight's CB3 meeting]

Gigi Li will serve as chair of Community Board 3 for a third term after defeating challenger Chad Marlow in a vote this evening.

CB3 members voted during the monthly meeting 31-15 in favor of Li, who has served two one-year terms as chair. Marlow is a current CB3 member.

In an unprecedented move, The Villager published an endorsement of Marlow last week, an unusual editorial decision given that only CB3 members vote for the chair.

According to the paper:

CB3 is clearly in disarray, and there is a growing sense of disconnect with the community that it is supposed to serve.

There is a strong sentiment for change, both within the community and on CB3.

Apparently CB3 members don't agree.

Updated 5:32 a.m.

BoweryBoogie attended the meeting and filed a report here.

Per BoweryBoogie on the outcome:

So, now it’s another year of potential botched decisions and hyperlocal scandals. And through it all, the community suffers.

Updated 11:10 a.m.

The Lo-Down has meeting coverage here, including remarks from Li and Marlow.

Said Li:

This past year has been really challenging for us and, moving forward, I am committed to structural and leadership changes that I believe are the core issues. Time and time again over the past few years I have seen how this board and this community are better, stronger and more resilient when we fight the fight together and not apart.

Previously on EV Grieve:
The Villager calls for change atop Community Board 3 (31 comments)

Monday, June 23, 2014

[Updated] The Villager calls for change atop Community Board 3

In an unprecedented move, The Villager has published an endorsement for the chair of Community Board 3 (CB3).

This is unusual given that CB3 members vote for the chair — it's not any kind of general election for residents. (By the way, the vote is tomorrow night.)

However, The Villager feels strongly that change is needed at the top. Gigi Li, who has served two one-year terms as chairperson, is running for re-election to a third term. Chad Marlow, a CB3 board member for two years, is opposing her.

There is a lot at stake, namely, the future direction of the board and, thus, of the neighborhood.

The newspaper lays out recent incidents, such as Li's decision to suspend the LES Dwellers from meetings, that have marred CB3's reputation. In addition, another board member said that Li failed to appoint any Black or Latino members as the chair of a committee, subcommittee or task force.

CB3 is clearly in disarray, and there is a growing sense of disconnect with the community that it is supposed to serve.

There is a strong sentiment for change, both within the community and on CB3.

And!

CB3 has fallen into a rut, and the community has lost trust that their voices are being heard. And, in the case of the LES Dwellers, their voice was actually silenced by the board for a period of time. This is not community democracy the way it’s supposed to work.

And so The Villager is strongly supporting Marlow as the new CB3 chair — "For the good of the community board and of the neighborhood."

While we have never personally met Marlow, he has been a frequent and credible source of information to us through the years. (He is one of the few CB3 members who doesn't seem to adopt a bunker mentality with the press, as The Villager noted.)

Among Marlow's accomplishments: Successfully spearheading the Alphabet City-Tompkins Square Slow Zone ... and forming the Tompkins Square Park & Playgrounds Parents’ Association to help curb the rat population in the Park.

And last year, Marlow launched the crowdfunding campaign that raised nearly $19,000 for the family of gravely injured East Village Farm and Grocery worker Akkas Ali.

Back to The Villager:

[W]e’re impressed by his record of accomplishment, and we feel, were he elected, he simply would — get things done, and that he would get the right things, positive things done. In short, he is more activist and energetic than Li, and that’s what we need.

Updated 6-24
Li won the election. Read more about it here.


Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Here's how you can apply to be a community board member

Do you like long meetings? Do you enjoy having your name or photo appear on local blogs? Do you like neighborhood block associations? Then do we have a job for you!

No, no — we kid because we love… here's your chance to be part of your local Community Board … and be "representative voices" of your community.

From the EVG inbox yesterday...

The Manhattan Borough President's Office is currently accepting applications for community board membership. Community boards represent their neighborhoods on crucial issues such as development, land use, historic preservation and city service delivery. Serving on a board is an incredible opportunity to be at the forefront of sound community-based planning.

To find out more about Manhattan's community boards, learn how to apply for membership, or download an application, click here. Applications are due by February 1, 2014.

Sincerely,

Scott M. Stringer
Manhattan Borough President

Monday, April 15, 2013

Report: Boukiés owner sues State Liquor Authority

Christos Valtzoglou, the owner of Boukiés (try the Spanakotyropitakia!) on Second Avenue and East Second Street, is suing the State Liquor Authority over an "illegal agreement" with Community Board 3, DNAinfo reported today.

Per the article:

[T]he SLA's decision not to grant a full liquor license to Christos Valtzoglou’s East Village restaurant Boukiés was based on an agreement between Community Board 3 and Valtzoglou that the board did not have the authority to make.

It's a little complicated, and dates back to when Valtzoglou could only get approval for beer-wine for his well-received but short-lived Heartbreak Cafe at the same address.

Also from the article.

Susan Stetzer, District Manager of CB3, appeared at the meeting to voice opposition to Valtzoglou’s application, according to legal documents alleging the board was interested more in asserting its power than in acting in the community interest.

“CB3 was motivated more by its interest in keeping its authority intact rather than representing the interests of its community members,” according to the lawsuit.

Boukiés opened almost one year ago to this date. Stetzer said that she was unaware of the lawsuit and declined to comment to DNAinfo.

Read the whole article here.

Monday, April 1, 2013

[Updated] Here is your new Community Board 3

From the EV Grieve inbox...

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer today proudly announced the appointment of 76 new members to Manhattan’s 12 Community Boards. This year’s appointees continue the trend of increased diversity among board members and include small business owners, including those recovering from Hurricane Sandy, NYCHA residents, clergy members, parent leaders and a fifth generation New Yorker. A full list of appointees can be found here.

Here's the rundown for our own CB3...



...if we can count, there are 8 new members, whose names are in bold in the list below...



The Lo-Down has more information about the 8 new members here.

The Lo-Down notes that one of the new CB3 members is Teresa Pedroza, the grandmother of Dashane Santana, the 12 year old who was killed while crossing Delancey Street last year. She was successful in calling on new safety measures for this notoriously dangerous stretch of Delancey.

[Photo of Teresa Pedroza from last May by Shawn Chittle]