Showing posts with label Big Belly. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Big Belly. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Big Belly trash cans go MIA around Tompkins Square Park

As you may have noticed, the city has removed the solar-powered, Big Belly trash cans around Tompkins Square Park. 

The plain ol' trash cans are now back on the corners, such as Seventh Street and Avenue A (above!) and 10th Street and Avenue A...
And Vinny & O shared these photos from 10th Street and Avenue B yesterday ... (that one outside Sheen Brothers seemed to be chronically full or on the fritz) ...
The Big Belly trash cans arrived here in July 2017 as part of the city's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like this one.

The Daily News previously reported that each can costs $7,000. Not sure how effective they are/were with trash piled atop the pricy cans (here and here, for example) or being out of order (here and here, for example).

The Big Belly receptacles remain inside Tompkins Square Park...

Monday, September 14, 2020

It's full, wrapped in plastic: A Big Belly on B needs emptied out

An EVG reader shares these Big Belly photos from outside Sheen Brothers on Avenue B at 10th Street... the solar-powered trash can is full... and to prevent people from continuing using this for trash, or even stacking stuff on top, someone basically wrapped it with plastic and posted multiple notes ...


The Big Belly trash cans arrived here in July 2017 as part of the city's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like this one.

H/T Pete Martell!

Thursday, November 7, 2019

A pause for poetry at this Big Belly trash can in Tompkins Square Park



Here's another use for a Big Belly, the solar-powered trash cans once at the front lines of the Mayor's rat-reduction plan ... EVG contributor Derek Berg spotted one in Tompkins Square Park with a hand-drawn poem titled "Three Children" (author unknown).

Probably squeeze some ads on there too...

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Trash PSA on Avenue A



EVG reader Annabelle shares this from the southwest corner of Avenue A and Ninth Street... apparently the mayor's solar-powered Big Belly trash can is out of service (Day 21 per the sign).

Despite the obvious problem with the Big Belly, people continue to stack trash on top on the pile of trash...



Staff from Doc Holliday's is behind at least some of the signage...



Updated 9/22

Someone cleaned up the trash... but the Big Belly is still broken...

Friday, September 13, 2019

Big bellies up



Dave on 7th shares this photo from East River Park... where he spotted this stack of the mayor's rat-friendly, solar-powered Big Belly trash cans.

Not sure why they're here (don't recall seeing any along the East River Park in the past). The Daily News previously reported that each can costs $7,000.

Previously on EV Grieve:
March and rally for East River Park on Sept. 21; another public hearing set

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

City reportedly winning the rat race; the return of rat-friendly trash cans to Tompkins Square Park


[Photo from December by Vinny & O]

The Wall Street Journal provides an update on the city's $32 million effort to reduce its rat population. (The article is behind the paper's paywall.)

A quick takeaway:

And while it is working, city officials said changes in temperature could make it harder to keep the fast-breeding vermin in check. Warmer winters like this season's, which didn't have sustained below-freezing temperatures, increase rat populations.

"You need three weeks of below-freezing weather so they don't come out for food," said Deputy Mayor Laura Anglin, who oversees the rat-fighting initiative.

Regardless, since the mayor launched his rat-fighting campaign in 2017, information from NYC's 311 service shows that overall rat complaints are down. "Across the city, they fell 7% in 2018 compared with 2017, the biggest reduction in more than a decade," per the Journal.

Anglin gave credit to the use of dry ice instead of poison to suffocate rats from their burrows as well as the installation of those solar-powered Big Belly garbage cans in city parks — including Tompkins Square Park. (Per the article: The 124 parks in rat zones had a 43% reduction in rat burrows.)

Those Big Bellies arrived in and around Tompkins in July 2017. (The Daily News reported at the time that each can costs $7,000.)

While the city is citing success with the Big Bellies, they'd likely have even more (as we've pointed out previously) if the city emptied the trash cans more often — especially on these nice spring days.


[Photo from Sunday morning]

Several EVG readers have also noted that the Parks crew is now using the rat-friendly trash cans again in Tompkins for some reason...



As one reader noted, people tend to use the regular trash cans over a Big Belly given the choice...


[Photos from March 30]

P.S.

Ending with some fun facts and a rather lyrical quote from Robert Corrigan, a rodentologist who has worked as a consultant for the city. He told the Journal that on some Manhattan blocks, rats likely outnumber people 5 to 1.

"They're in sewers, they're in subways, they’re in parks, they're in people’s ceilings," he said. "It's hard to think of where they are not."

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Big Belly ache



Two of the rat-proof Big Belly trash receptacles on Avenue A remain out of commission...like this one on the southeast corner at Seventh Street...



... and the northwest corner at 10th Street...



The solar-powered trash cans arrived in July 2017 as part of the mayor's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like this one. The Daily News reported at the time that each can costs $7,000.

Previously on EV Grieve:
8 more solar-powered, rat-proof trash cans arrive in Tompkins Square Park

Looking at the Big Belly 1.0 and 2.0 in and around Tompkins Square Park

City ready to attack rats in Tompkins Square Park (and elsewhere) (again)

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Noted



The city has unveiled its new #KeepNYCTrashFree campaign on Avenue A at St. Mark's Place...



Not sure at the moment who's responsible for this street art ... (and thanks to Christine Champagne for the photo!)

Updated

Thanks to the readers who shared the artist's name...

View this post on Instagram

#keepnyctrashfree 1/3

A post shared by WINSTON TSENG (@winstontseng) on


Updated 9 p.m.

That didn't last long, as Christine noted...

Monday, May 14, 2018

The latest on the city's rat-curbing initiatives


[Photo from May 9 by EVG reader Annabelle]

The Post checks in on the mayor's latest effort to curb the city's rat population ...

The city has begun stationing an army of workers in 30 parks in Manhattan, Brooklyn and The Bronx to warn people that it “has experienced problems with rats” and make sure they know that “rats are a health hazard, especially to children and seniors,” according to internal Parks Department e-mails and sources.

But some residents say the move only shows that City Hall is a Mickey Mouse operation.

“You know what would be more useful? If de Blasio had them empty the trash more often,” said Rob Wooster, in Tompkins Square Park in the East Village Sunday.

Chelsea Casey, 28, who was at the park with her three kids last week, added, “I don’t know what warning people about rats in New York City will achieve.”

Union members with the Parks Department said workers with both the agency’s Parks Enforcement Patrol and Urban Park Rangers divisions were first dispatched last week. The union said the move is sapping valuable manpower that is meant to police the city’s 30,000 acres of park land.

Last July, the city delivered new solar-powered trash cans to points in and around Tompkins Square Park as part of the mayor's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like this one. (The Daily News reported at the time that each can costs $7,000.)

As the top photo shows, the big bellies aren't really helping with the overflow of trash — at least when they're not emptied, as Rob Wooster told the Post.

The city would not respond to questions from the Post about whether the cans have been effective.


[Avenue A and 10th Street]

Previously on EV Grieve:
8 more solar-powered, rat-proof trash cans arrive in Tompkins Square Park

Looking at the Big Belly 1.0 and 2.0 in and around Tompkins Square Park

City ready to attack rats in Tompkins Square Park (and elsewhere) (again)

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Warm weather aftermath in Tompkins Square Park


[Yesterday morning]

Several residents have pointed out the over-flowing Big Belly trash cans in and around Tompkins Square Park after two days of warm weather...











The new solar-powered trash cans arrived last July as part of the mayor's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like this one. The Daily News reported at the time that each can costs $7,000.

The city delivered eight more Big Bellies to the Park last fall, and they don't seem to be helping with the overflow of trash, especially during nice days.

H/T Vinny & O and JG!

Previously on EV Grieve:
Looking at the Big Belly 1.0 and 2.0 in and around Tompkins Square Park

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Noted



Discovering a flaw in Mayor de Blasio's plan to help curb the rat population in Tompkins Square Park and elsewhere with the $7,000 Big Belly trash can.

Photo from this morning.

Saturday, October 7, 2017

8 more solar-powered, rat-proof trash cans arrive in Tompkins Square Park



Workers were out in Tompkins Square Park this morning... delivering and installing more solar-powered, rat-proof trash cans — the Big Belly — in the eastern section of the Park.



They are taking the place of these ...



... which do not provide much protection against hungry critters ... and whose circular design doesn't display art as well as the Big Belly model...



One of the workers said that they were delivering eight of the new trash receptacles to Tompkins Square Park.


[Photo by Steven]


[Photo by Steven]


[Photo by Steven]

The high-tech trash cans are part of Mayor de Blasio's $32 million plan to help reduce the number of rats in several neighborhoods, including the East Village. The first batch of the new Big Bellies arrived in the Park in July.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

City installs pre-tagged Big Belly on 7th Street and Avenue A



This afternoon, Derek Berg noted that a worker delivered a Big Belly to the northeast corner of Avenue A and Seventh Street ... one that, ingeniously or not, had already been tagged... (save someone the trouble of doing it later) ...



Back in June, workers placed these solar-powered trash cans in and around Tompkins Square Park as part of the city's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like here. (As I recall, the northeast corner of 7th and A didn't have its own Big Belly.)

As previously noted, the rat-proof trash cans — which cost $7,000 each, per the Daily News — might work when they are not full or have trash stacked next to them...


[Sept. 2]


[Sept. 9]

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Noted



Someone added a little detail to the new anti-rat, Big Belly trash can that the city placed here on the northwest corner of Avenue A and Seventh Street last Thursday. Big Belly watchers believe the addition arrived Monday night.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Looking at the Big Belly 1.0 and 2.0 in and around Tompkins Square Park


[10th and B]

Last week, workers placed new solar-powered, Big Belly trash cans in and around Tompkins Square Park as part of the city's $32-million plan to combat vermin in rat-popular neighborhoods, like this one.

Per the city:

The City will purchase 336 solar compactors that restrict access to trash with a “mail-box” opening and that have resulted in 90% rat reductions when fully deployed in concentrated areas. The City will also replace all the remaining wire waste baskets in the zones with 1,676 steel cans — both in parks and on street corners — which should meaningfully reduce rats’ access to food sources compared to current wire baskets.

However effective, they're no match for someone who decides to dump contents from their apartment at their mail-box opening...



While there are more of the new Big Belly trash cans deployed inside the Park, it may be a good idea to put several of them at key entry points, such as Avenue A and St. Mark's Place, alongside the Big Belly 1.0, which can be overmatched ...



and Avenue A at Ninth Street...



Still, the squirrels seem to like them...