Showing posts with label Howl! Happening. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Howl! Happening. Show all posts

Saturday, June 11, 2022

'Happy 35th Gay Anniversary' to Linda Simpson and My Comrade at Howl! Happening

Photos by Stacie Joy 

This summer, Howl! Happening is celebrating Linda Simpson's photographs and her groundbreaking magazine, My Comrade

Here's more about "My Comrade Magazine: Happy 35th Gay Anniversary" at the space, 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery:
My Comrade magazine was founded by drag queen Linda Simpson in 1987 during the dark era of the AIDS crisis and served as a symbol of hope and frivolity to the East Village gay scene and beyond. Armed with a tongue-in-cheek "revolutionary" agenda, the magazine glorified heroic drag queens and sexy guys in a cut-and-paste mishmash of articles and photo spreads. Lesbians got their due when the flip side became Sister! The sporadic publishing schedule produced a total of 11 issues until 1994. It was revived in 2004 for two more. 

The exhibit features reproductions and enlargements of My Comrade's black-and-white pages. Notable contributors to the magazine included photographers Jack Pierson and David Armstrong, painter Stephen Tashjian a.k.a. Tabboo!, and drag stars RuPaul and Lady Bunny. The exhibit also features Simpson's color photos of the era from her acclaimed 2021 photo book, "The Drag Explosion," published by Domain. 
EVG contributor Stacie Joy went to the opening last weekend, where she took these photos... including of Linda...
The First Street gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. "My Comrade Magazine: Happy 35th Gay Anniversary" will be up through July 17.

You can check out this feature at Dazed for more history.

Wednesday, April 20, 2022

'Low Fidelity' features the iconic photos from Bobby Grossman's downtown milieu

Howl! Arts/Howl! Archive on the Bowery has a new exhibit titled "Low Fidelity," a selection of Bobby Grossman's photographs of 1970s-1980s downtown icons. 

Some background via the Howl! website:
Grossman arrived in New York in 1976 after receiving a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), where he studied alongside friends Chris Frantz and David Byrne of Talking Heads. 
His first job was assisting Richard Bernstein, the artist responsible for the covers of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine. At Bernstein’s studio in the legendary Chelsea Hotel, Grossman found himself at ground zero in the early days of punk and the downtown scene. 
Taking photographs of friends and newfound acquaintances — including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Debbie Harry, the Ramones, David Bowie, Iggy Pop, and the milieu around Andy Warhol's Factory — Grossman became a regular fixture at CBGB, the Mudd Club and other downtown haunts.
And a little trivia: His first photo credit was the cover shot for Talking Heads' 1977 single "Psycho Killer."

You can check out "Low Fidelity" through May 29 at Howl! Arts/Howl! Archive, 250 Bowery at Stanton. Hours: Wednesday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free admission.
You can also read about the "Low Fidelity" book project here.

Previously on EV Grieve:

Friday, November 19, 2021

A visit to Howl! Arts/Howl! Archive on the Bowery

Photos by Stacie Joy

In September, 
Howl Arts debuted a 7,000 square-foot facility at 250 Bowery. (Howl! Happening, which opened in 2015 at 6 E. First St., will remain in use as a gallery.) 

The new space goes by Howl! Arts/Howl! Archive, which "expands upon Howl! Happening's innovative exhibitions and public programs and focuses on the thriving multi-dimensional artistry and history of the East Village/Lower East Side." 

Earlier this fall, EVG contributor stopped by the space between Houston and Stanton for a look around... courtesy of Jane Friedman, Howl Art's founder and executive director ...
East Village-based artist Scooter LaForge was also on hand...
The space includes three exhibition galleries, a library as well as screening and reading rooms. It also serves as the headquarters for Howl Arts, which purchased the commercial space here in 2018.
Howl! Arts/Howl! Archive is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. You can check out their website for a list of exhibitions and other info. 

Sunday, September 19, 2021

Howl Arts debuts new exhibition space on the Bowery

Howl Arts is ready to debut a second space, a 7,000 square-foot facility at 250 Bowery between Houston and Stanton. (Howl! Happening, which opened in 2015 at 6 E. First St., will remain in use as a gallery.) 

The new space is going by Howl! Arts/Howl! Archive (HA/HA), which "expands upon Howl! Happening's innovative exhibitions and public programs and focuses on the thriving multi-dimensional artistry and history of the East Village/Lower East Side." 

It will also serve as the headquarters for Howl Arts, which purchased the commercial space here in 2018.

Here's more via the Howl press announcement:
By the community, for the community, HA/HA will be activated with three exhibition galleries, as well as a library, screening and reading rooms, a chef's kitchen, and an outdoor terrace for special events. 
Energized by the creative and disruptive spirit of the 60s, 70s, and 80s on the Lower East Side ... HA/HA expands Howl's programming capabilities and aims to advance Howl Arts' mission to preserve and showcase the legacy of often overlooked underground and experimental cultures of the East Village and downtown neighborhoods. 
"We've been fighting against gentrification in the East Village for decades," says Howl executive director Jane Friedman. 
Howl's Permanent Collection, to be showcased at HA/HA, comprises over 3,000 objects, including art, rare digital and analog media, performance-art ephemera, and personal archives from the 1960s onward. 
The collection documents the origins and growth of local cultural and social movements that have had far-reaching impact — offering a myriad of opportunities for new interpretations of the punk, new-wave, and no-wave movements; performance art; drag; street art; public-access television; nightlife; LGBTQ activism; the AIDS epidemic; and urban gentrification.
And the inaugural exhibition opens today (Sept. 19) from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.:
"Icons, Iconoclasts, and Outsiders" presents works by artists, writers, musicians, scenesters, performers, icons, iconoclasts, outsiders and other creators from the 1960s to the present whose life and work energized the underground and are now entering mainstream cultural discourse.
Selected works on display include Arturo Vega, Brian Butterick, Richard Hambleton, Helen Oliver Adelson, Marcia Resnick and Scooter LaForge, among many others. 

The exhibit is up through Oct. 31. Hours: Wednesday-Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

This main-floor and lower-level space at 250 Bowery was previously the International Center of Photography, which moved to a new home on Broome Street. The Howl HQ is on the upper floors.

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Spring forward with Al Diaz

Acclaimed street artist Al Diaz, whose career spans 50 years in NYC, is the subject of a new (virtual) exhibition via the East Village-based Howl! Happening starting tomorrow.

On Tuesday, Diaz added a seasonal touch to the gate at 246 Bowery (at Stanton Street) ... the message reads: "Spring. Nature's Most Optimistic Gesture."

NY1's Roger Clark caught up with Diaz while on the Bowery.
If the letters on Diaz's work look familiar, it's because they are made up of reclaimed New York City Transit Wet Paint Sign characters, and subway system icons.  

"Being a New Yorker and all, it's a kind of ubiquitous alphabet, constrained alphabet, that as commuters we see every day," said Diaz, who makes messages of all sorts with those letters intended to inspire action.
Diaz grew up in the Jacob Riis Houses on Avenue D. He started writing graffiti at age 12. As a teen in the late 1970s, he and his friend Jean-Michel Basquiat collaborated on a series of cryptic messages seen around the city signed from SAMO©

The show at Howl!, titled A Subterraneous Journal, features work that Diaz created during the pandemic. 

Find more info about the exhibit, which is on through May 30, at this link

Previously on EV Grieve:

Sunday, August 23, 2020

'Bringing Back Bowery: Public Art as Protest' extended at Howl! Happening


[Photo by Stacie Joy]

You have one more week to see "Bringing Back Bowery: Public Art as Protest" at Howl! Happening.

The exhibit, originally set to end today, will be up through Aug. 30 now.

The group show is an outgrowth of an effort organized by Bowery artist Sono Kuwayama in June. She received permission from store owners to paint on the plywood of the boarded-up businesses along the Bowery. She then reached out to some local artists to have them create murals.

These works have been preserved and are now on display at Howl!

The gallery, 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery, is open Wednesday-Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Find more details about the artists at this link.

Howl! is limiting the number of visitors at any one time, and requires masks for everyone. Guests must also register upon entering and have their temperature taken.

Previously on EV Grieve:
A look at 'Bringing Back Bowery' at Howl! Happening

Saturday, August 15, 2020

A look at 'Bringing Back Bowery' at Howl! Happening



Howl! Happening reopened Thursday with a special exhibit titled "Bringing Back Bowery: Public Art as Protest."

The group show is an outgrowth of an effort organized by Bowery artist Sono Kuwayama in June. She received permission from store owners to paint on the plywood of the boarded-up businesses along the Bowery. She then reached out to some local artists to have them create murals.

These works have been preserved and are now on display at Howl! EVG contributor Stacie Joy stopped by Thursday for a look...






[Scooter LaForge's "People Have the Power"]


[Izhar Patkin's "Aria: After the Black Paintings"]


[Sono Kuwayama in front of her work "Look Up"]


["Little Boy Blue" by Catt Caulley, Grace H. Gutekanst & Robert Blodgett]


["Black Trans Lives Matter" by Maya Edelman, Scooter LaForge & Sono Kuwayama]


[Sono Kuwayama, Scooter LaForge, Hitomi Nakamura & James Rubio]

Howl! Happening, 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery, is open Thursday-Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The show ends on Aug. 23.

The gallery is limiting the number of visitors at any one time, and will require masks for everyone. Guests must also register upon entering and have their temperature taken. Find more details about the artists at this link.

Thursday, August 13, 2020

'Public Art as Protest' debuts at Howl! Happening



Howl! Happening reopens today with a special exhibit titled "Bringing Back Bowery: Public Art as Protest."

The group show is an outgrowth of an effort organized by Bowery artist Sono Kuwayama in June. (Read more about it here.)

She received permission from store owners to paint on the plywood of the boarded-up businesses along the Bowery. She then reached out to some local artists to have them create murals, such as Love Power between Great Jones and Fourth Street...



... created by East Village-based artist Scooter LaForge along with Hitomi Nakamura and James Rubio.

The murals, which were started to feel the effects of the summer heat, will now find a second life at Howl! Here's more about the show:

After the tragic death of George Floyd, impassioned citizens in cities around the world rose up together in a call for justice. The streets became the backdrop for our collective mourning, our outrage, and our plea for change. Opportunistic agitators took advantage of peaceful demonstrations and forced many businesses to board up storefronts all over New York. On the Bowery ... the plywood barriers became windows into the hearts of the neighborhood’s artists.

"Bringing Back Bowery: Public Art as Protest" is a re-presentation of public artworks made in solidarity with the protest movement fighting for racial equality and police reform.

Howl! Happening, 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery, is open Thursday-Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The show ends on Aug. 23.

The gallery is limiting the number of visitors at any one time, and will require masks for everyone. Guests must also register upon entering and have their temperature taken. Find more details at this link.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Last weekend for this depiction of 1980s Times Square at Howl! Happening



Jane Dickson’s exhibit, "Hot, Hot, Hot," ends its residency at Howl! Happening tomorrow (Sunday!).

The show features "a series of rarely seen and moody paintings of Times Square peep shows from the 1980s." And here's more via the Howl! website:

Dickson’s history and legacy are rooted in Times Square. She worked and lived there from 1978 to 2008 documenting her daily lived experiences and observations as a young woman. In photos, drawings, and paintings that utilize unconventional industrial and domestic materials as surfaces — including carpet, sandpaper, and black plastic bags—she captured a time and place that was notoriously lawless, squalid, and vibrantly alive.





Read more about her work at this link.

Howl! Happening is at 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery.

The hours are from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and tomorrow.

---

I like her work and backstory... here's more via an interview from January 2019...

Friday, October 18, 2019

Marc H. Miller on 20 years atop 98 Bowery



Artist and curator Marc H. Miller, who we've featured on EVG through the years (see links below!), will be at Howl! Happening tomorrow (Saturday) night discussing his life downtown ... particularly the years he lived in a loft at 98 Bowery as an observer and participant in the changes taking place in art and music.

A quick overview of what to expect:

Drawing from the site’s archive of photos and video clips, Miller recounts stories about Harry’s Bar and CBGB; the seminal 1978 Punk Art show; collaborative work with Bettie Ringma, Curt Hoppe, Alan Moore, and Paul Tschinkel — all residents at 98 Bowery; his year in Amsterdam; and the varied roles he played in the East Village art scene and in the rise of hip-hop culture in the 1980s.

Miller is the curator of the Hey! Ho! Let’s Go: Ramones and the Birth of Punk exhibition at the Queens Museum (2016), and for his video interview with Jean-Michel Basquiat in Paul Tschinkel’s Art/new york series. His online store Gallery 98 has reanimated vintage art ephemera.

Miller will also be unveiling an an updated version of his website 98 Bowery: 1969-89.

The presentation begin tomorrow (Oct. 19) at 7 p.m. at Howl! Happening, 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery.

You can also read a Q&A between Miller and Eric Davidson at Please Kill Me right here.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Life at 98 Bowery: 1969-1989 (Q&A with Miller)

Revisiting Punk Art

On the Bowery: CBGB and its impact on the visual arts and downtown nightlife

Saturday, September 14, 2019

At the opening of Linus Coraggio's 'Ramifications'



On Thursday night, Howl! Happening opened its fall season featuring the work — sculpture, painting and mixed media — of local artist Linus Coraggio.

The exhibit, titled "Ramifications," drew a large crowd on Thursday, including alum from the Rivington School sculptors group.



Here's more via Howl! about the artist and exhibit:

Linus Coraggio is a central figure in downtown New York’s early period of explosive art experimentation and cross-pollination of cultural ideas. Street artist and New York City native, Coraggio is best known for his abstract metal sculpture.

The current exhibition surveys Coraggio’s entire body of work, including paintings in expressionist and graffiti style, mobiles, furniture, neon, sculpture, mixed-media collage, and both classic and 3-D graffiti. The exhibition will also include recent collaborations with well-known downtown artists, and an installation of his painted and “sculpturalized” car that has become a recognized cultural fixture on the streets of New York City over the last 10 years.

EVG contributor Stacie Joy stopped by the opening and shared these photos...


[Linus Coraggio]















... and a survey of the work...









You can see the rest of his work at Howl! Happening, 6 E. First St. between Second Avenue and the Bowery. Hours: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday.

According to the Howl! website: "The exhibition runs through October 10, with a special closing event on October 12."