Showing posts with label Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. Show all posts

Thursday, December 30, 2021

Brownout at the former St. Brigid School

Work continues at the former St. Brigid School on the NE corner of Avenue B and Seventh Street.

EVG reader Robert Miner reports that workers painted the former school's green strip brown on Sunday.

And yesterday...
... workers removed the St. Brigid's banners from out front...
In February 2019, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of that academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents and faculty alike. Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese in 2019. 

Given its A-plus EV location with Tompkins Square Park views, some residents have figured this property would end up a high-end condoplex much like the former Mary Help of Christians on Avenue A and 12th Street. 

However, as Dave on 7th pointed out, the work here suggests that the Archdiocese is prepping the two-level building for rental for another school (perhaps a charter school?). 

A corner to watch in 2022!

Thursday, December 23, 2021

Activity at the former St. Brigid School on Avenue B and 7th Street

The St. Brigid School on Avenue B and Seventh Street has sat empty for two-plus years, ever since classes ended for the summer in June 2019.

As we first reported in February 2019, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of the current academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents, and faculty alike. Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.

Nearby residents are curious about what might happen to the two-level building and subsequent property — prime East Village real estate with views of Tompkins Square Park.

EVG reader Robert Miner recently saw workers removing classroom furniture during the day... with a crew painting the interior in the evening... 
Per Robert: "Not sure if they're sprucing it up for sale or a reopening — but at least it's unlikely they're moving towards demolition if they're putting in this effort."

There's nothing on file with the Department of Buildings indication any future development here. 

The Archdiocese has seen sales of more than $80 million for two former East Village churches in recent years.

Developer Douglas Steiner bought the former Mary Help of Christians property on Avenue A at 12th Street in 2012 from the Archdiocese of New York for $41 million. During the summer of 2013, workers demolished the church, school and rectory to make way for Steiner East Village, the block-long condoplex.

In March 2020, Gemini Rosemont, an L.A.-based real-estate investor, bought the former Church of the Nativity property on Second Avenue between Second Street and Third Street for $40 million. 

The Church of St. Brigid-St. Emeric (and the rectory) remain in use next door. The church was spared from the wrecking ball, reopening in January 2013 after a renovation.

Monday, June 24, 2019

Permanent vacation now for the St. Brigid School



Classes ended for the summer last week at the St. Brigid School on Avenue B and Seventh Street.

As we first reported in early February, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School would cease operations at the end of the current academic year, a move that blindsided students, parents and faculty alike. According to one parent: "Kids sent home crying with a letter to their parent/guardian. School being closed by the Archdiocese without warning."

Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School was one of seven city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese.

Despite the Archdiocese’s best efforts to maintain the operational and financial viability of the school, continuing to educate students in a building that is underutilized and in need significant improvements has proven unfeasible.

St. Brigid School students will have the opportunity to continue their Catholic education at another nearby Catholic School...

Stunned parents took action, launching a Twitter account and a Facebook group and petition ... as well as organizing a town hall to ask for more transparency about this decision.

Joseph Zwilling, a spokesperson for the Archdiocese, told the Post in an article on Feb. 9 that the school did have money left in its endowment fund — about $1.5 million. He also said the school was losing $850,000 a year. "It is a sad reality that it is nearly impossible to run a school with only 119 students in Grades K-8," he said.

We haven't heard anything else about the school's closure since late February. There aren't any updated messages (other than the initial announcement from February) on the school's website about the permanent closure ... and the social media accounts launched after news of the closing broke have been dormant since late February.



For now, no word on what the Archdiocese has planned for this prime corner real estate that overlooks Tompkins Square Park...



Previously on EV Grieve:
Report: What happened to the donated money earmarked for St. Brigid School?

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

The Archdiocese of New York is shutting down the St. Brigid School on Avenue B and 7th Street



St. Brigid School, which was founded in 1856, will close at the end of this school year, stunned students, parents and teachers learned yesterday.

Said one: "Kids sent home crying with a letter to their parent/guardian. School being closed by the Archdiocese without warning." Another parent told me this via Facebook: "The school said they had no idea. Teachers and the administration are distraught and so sad ... such a good and well-kept school. Hard to believe."

Here's the announcement on the school's website:

On Feb. 4, the Archdiocese of New York announced that St. Brigid School in Manhattan will cease operations at the end of the current academic year.

We understand that this is upsetting and concerning news, but rest assured that additional information on this development, as well as the resources to ensure that your child can continue their education at an excellent Catholic School nearby, will be forthcoming this week and posted on a special web page we have created for parents: https://catholicschoolsny.org/st-brigid, where additional information and resources will be available and updated regularly.

Here's what the Archdiocese posted:

On February 4, the Archdiocese of New York announced changes to a number of Catholic schools across the Archdiocese. Regretfully, St. Brigid School will cease operations at the end of the current academic year.

Despite the Archdiocese’s best efforts to maintain the operational and financial viability of the school, continuing to educate students in a building that is underutilized and in need significant improvements has proven unfeasible.

St. Brigid School students will have the opportunity to continue their Catholic education at another nearby Catholic School, some of which are listed below. We encourage you to visit potential schools at your earliest convenience to see how your child can continue receiving an excellent faith-based education.

• Guardian Angel Elementary School
• Immaculate Conception Elementary School
• Our Lady of Pompeii Elementary School
• Transfiguration Elementary School

Only one of those schools, Immaculate Conception, is in the East Village.

St. Brigid, located on Avenue B at Seventh Street (prime spot for condos some day), serves students from nursery school through 8th grade.

St. Brigid's Roman Catholic Church on Avenue B at Eighth Street was nearly demolished in 2006, but an unknown donor put up the money ($20 million) to renovate the historic structure. The church reopened in January 2013.

Updated 10 a.m.

School parents are organizing ... and they want to know more about the decision to close St. Brigid.



Said one parent in the comments:

Receiving a letter home in a kid's backpack, like it was a field trip permission slip, is unacceptable. It gave no concrete reasons but claims that they did their best to keep the school open. It is not 'your best' if you did not include the community most affected. The families are not naive, but they are getting organized!

There is a Twitter account now — @BrigidSave ... and a Facebook group.

Updated 5 p.m.

The Post followed up on the story, talking to students and parents...

Heartsick students at a 163-year-old Manhattan Catholic school burst into tears Monday after learning it would shutter permanently at the end of this academic year.

Founded in 1856, the Saint Brigid School in the East Village was one of five city Catholic schools marked for closure by the Archdiocese of New York this week.

“They told us during assembly,” said a downcast Carly Auringer, an 11-year-old sixth-grader. “Everyone was crying.”

Students said they had formed rare bonds with classmates over the years — and struggled to accept being separated from them next year.

Image via Google Street View

Sunday, May 17, 2009

Holy rollers

"During the peak of the real estate boom, one of New York’s largest landowners unloaded more than $100 million worth of property — and might have sold more if not for the parishioners who clung to their churches and blocked the bulldozers. The seller was the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, which closed more than two dozen houses of worship and schools between 2003 and 2008." (The New York Times)