Saturday, January 8, 2011

Billy's Antiques not getting its confiscated subway signs back



Catching up on some news from yesterday afternoon.... Last March, police arrested Billy Leroy and charged him with a felony of possession of stolen property in connection with subway signs that were seized from Billy's Antiques on East Houston.

Yesterday, the Times reported:

A Manhattan judge this week ruled against an antiques dealer attempting to get back subway signs that the police seized from him last year in a criminal case that was eventually dismissed.

But the judge, Rita Mella of Criminal Court, did empathize with the dealer, William LeRoy, and urged the State Legislature to change the laws governing cases like Mr. LeRoy’s.

Because state law does not give criminal courts the right to return to defendants belongings seized from them under a search warrant, Mr. LeRoy may be forced to file a lawsuit to get them back, “a measure that places a substantial financial burden on that individual, and contravenes the due process rights the courts and Legislature have sought to protect,” Judge Mella wrote in a 15-page decision.

Ronald L. Kuby, one of Mr. LeRoy’s lawyers, said his client was still considering his next step. The cost of continuing the litigation would be greater than the value of the signs... Mr. Kuby said.


As Billy said in an e-mail to me, "Well, looks like I'm fucked."

9 comments:

Morgan Tsvangirai said...

What a crock of shit.

Anonymous said...

great DONG painting !and cool sign..

Lisa said...

Morgan, you are so right. What the hell "crime" was Billy committing by having these old signs that aren't even used any more? Once again, Bloomberg's storm troopers wreak havoc. His last day in office can't come soon enough, altho I doubt we'll get anyone in there who'll unclench enough to make living in NY a bit more relaxed again.

OWR said...

Living in New York was RELAXED???
Which New York have you been living in???

clayton patterson said...

In terms of a funny photo- very NYC street-- your choice of photos reflecting Billy's: this is a great photo- who took it? Someone deserves credit. Very funny!.

My opinion--

This case of Billy LeRoy and his signs is so reflective of this new Bloomburg world we live in. It has become almost impossible for the little person working for themselves to make a living in this city. And now we have the courts stealing from the little guy, the independent, the guy trying to make an honest living for his family. I mean what is with this? Billy LeRoy made a part of his living by legally buying discarded MTA signs, and selling them at a profit. MTA accuses Billy of theft. Billy LeRoy wins his case, but Cy Vance, Bloomberg's pal decides he wants to punish him anyway by trying to destroy his chance to make a living. There is so much wrong in this story. Overlooking Bloomberg's desire to empty the city of the middle-class and below, the nastiness of the court, the MTA cannot even properly sell their own garbage-- all these knuckheads are our suppose to our leaders? Please. thanks clayotn patterson

EV Grieve said...

Thanks for the comment, Clayton...

I took the shot one day last summer...

Anonymous said...

Who's the stud/ muffin? Does he work there YUM YUM

Lisa said...

OWR - I lived in a New York where the law didn't clamp down on every single aspect of your existence - where even though there was a distinct "Wild West" aspect to life, there was still a feeling that you had some freedom to live your life the way YOU saw fit to. I lived in a New York that was not a nanny state where the powers that be decided was bad for you and needed to be restricted in your life because you weren't intelligent enough to make your own decisions. I lived in a New York where the mayor was not a tight-ass lecturing bully who feels free to loose the cops on the citizenry in an attempt to quash any hint of rebellion, individuality, personal freedom. I lived in a New York where you could still take risks and not have to worry about getting jailed. And since you have no idea what I was talking about, you obviously did not, so lighten up. The New York of the 1970s and 1980s was dangerous, lawless, broke, risque and almost Third World - but it was a far more interesting, artistic, fun and accepting place to be.

OWR said...

Lisa, your Utopian NYC of the 1970's and 1980's never existed. I was living and growing up on Avenue D at that point uin my life. The Utopian, creative wondeful, luscious, ad nauseum NYC that you described didnt exist east of 1st Avenue. I recall gangs, death, shootings and Junkies. Is this the loving, beautiful world that you are referring to? If so, I beg out of agreeing with you. The so-called fascist Guliani smacked some sense into the robotic masses of this city that accepted such bullshit to be the norm. If that is offensive to you so be it. You are always welcome to return to Berkley or whatever Utopian free-loving/free-living town from whence you came. New York City was always the Wild West (East?) it's just a little bit tamer now.