Monday, February 6, 2017

A look at the Moxy Hotel coming to 11th Street



Demolition work continues at 112-120 E. 11th St., where five walk-up buildings are coming down to make way for the 13-story hotel for Marriott’s Moxy brand here between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue.

Meanwhile, we hadn't seen any renderings for this 300-room hotel aimed toward the Millennial set. Stonehill & Taylor are the architects of record. (They designed the one going up in Chelsea.) However, their website didn't have anything on the East 11th Street property.

Turns out that we were looking in the wrong place. CityRealty had the first look back in December ... via Flintlock Construction...


[Rendering by Flintlock Construction]

Thoughts?

Work permits on file with the city show that the hotel will be 78,361 square feet — about 250 square feet per room. In addition, the permits show a lounge in the hotel's basement along with an "eating and drinking establishment with accessory terrace." The application also shows a lounge and another eating and drinking establishment on the first floor/lobby (not sure if these are connected) ... as well as a "grab n go" food and drink space. There's also another bar-restaurant planned for the top floor.

The permits, first filed in September, are still awaiting the city's approval. They were disapproved (again) on Friday, per the DOB.

Local residents, preservationists and local elected officials have all spoken out about the demolition of the "landmark-elegible" buildings and loss of housing.

The Moxy website shows that the 11th Street hotel is expected to open in late 2018.

And if you're new to the Moxy brand, here's more via its website:

Moxy is a boutique hotel with the social heart of a hostel. A free-spirited place where you can do all that crazy fun stuff you’d never think of doing at home, together with likeminded spirits you’d otherwise never have met.

Yes, the WiFi is speedy and the cushy beds are freshly made, but more importantly, the bar is always open and the crew is always on. Whether you’re staying for the night or just a nightcap, you’ll see why it’s no place like home.

Previously on EV Grieve:
6-building complex on East 10th Street and East 11th Street sells for $127 million

Report: 300-room hotel planned for East 11th Street

Preservationists say city ignored pitch to designate part of 11th Street as a historic district

Permits filed to demolish 5 buildings on 11th Street to make way for new hotel (58 comments)

At the Moxy hotel protest on 11th Street last evening

29 comments:

Scuba Diva said...

A free-spirited place where you can do stuff you'd get arrested for doing at home…

Anonymous said...

I am so glad I live avenues away from this 24-7-365 shit show. This "deal" and the Rivington House scam are poster children of a mayors betrayal of this cities middle and working class residents. Shame on you Bill.

Anonymous said...

Will the hotel be donating any affordable housing -- god knows, we need it.

Thanks DeBlasio for nothing> We really dont want you re-elected!

Anonymous said...

I can almost smell the vomit now....

WHOOO!

George Archer said...

Now I'm nauseous and I have to have to get on a conference call. Thanks, EV.

Anonymous said...

The look of the East Village is transforming from late 1800s/early 1900s human and humane facades to vapid lifeless blocks. This hotel, another nail in the coffin.

Anonymous said...

Bland, sterile, corporate - everything Marriott likes but that the East Village does not want or need. 75 units of stable, long-term residential housing in beautiful buildings sacrificed for 300 rooms of "woo-hoo! I can stay drunk 24/7!" Disgusting, and I'm never staying in any Marriott hotel anywhere again.

I wonder if "corporate" will start building flophouses for druggies to nod out in, if that's what the next "gen" wants?

DeBlas, you sold us out again; my once-reasonable neighborhood is now just a big party play-land for the young & stupid - like Bourbon Street north. Don't count on getting re-elected.

PS: Looking at the illustration, I notice it shows a hot-air balloon - something you ALWAYS see in the skies in NYC!- as if to tongue-in-cheek acknowledge just how much hot air their description is full of.

Anonymous said...

Such a shame, isn't there a really dorkily marketed and executed hotel up the street at 13th and 4th? The bar in a master stroke was dubbed, "singl"

Giovanni said...

Here's what the Moxy guests and neighbors have to look forward to. A review from Expedia for the Moxy inTempe, Arizona

Posted Jan 18, 2017
Pros: Big rooms, balcony.
Cons: No tolerance on drunks waking up the entire floor = OUT! Tub is falling apart.
Location: ASU - loud!
I stay at 4 Points in other cities and have always enjoyed my stay. However, this location is lacking. Bad, bad coffee = Maxwell House. Bottom of tub was pealing, no fridge or microwave. But, the kicker was the drunk freaks next to my room yelling, fighting, slamming doors. I called the front desk and they sent up the janitor to talk with the drunks. Did it end - No? I was kept awake from 1 am to 3:30 am and I had to be up and out the door at 8 pm. I wont be back. Because your near ASU you need security staff that crack down on the BS!

Anonymous said...

The force behind the hotel and the demolition of five existing historic tenements buildings that hosted a number of rent regulated apartments and served as general housing for people in the neighborhood is David Lichenstein of the Lighthouse Group, who is named in one of the Mayor's ongoing scandals. He donated tens of thousands of dollars per the Mayor's instructions apparently, and also was named to the NYCEDC by deblasio. Is this scheme art of the investigations one wonders.

Anonymous said...

How is a hotel supposed to work in this location with the mess of Webster Hall and their regular usurpation of traffic lanes to pen in their customers directly across the street? Entire street is often closed to vehicular traffic or virtually impassable on foot and a complete mess of out-of-control, often vomiting, patrons and thuggish security just barely maintaining order among throngs awaiting entrance. Once word of this gets out on hotel review sites, who would ever stay here? Does Marriott have a longer term view of Webster Hall's continuing operation we're not yet privy to or are they actually executing irregardless of what conditions here will be?

cmarrtyy said...

We are the dumping ground for the city. And our pols let hem do this to us. WE NEED OPEN PRIMARIES. WE DON'T NEED ONE PARTY TO DOMINATE GOVERNMENT. WE NEED DEBATE. Last week Rosie headlined a rally for the immigration ban because Mayor Bill is trying to ride his progressive agenda to second term. But she will never headline a rally to stop the destruction of the EV by the real estate industry...the Moxy... Astor Plaza. WHO IS THERE TO HELP US!?

Gojira said...

"Thoughts?"

Hare ya go - yet another dreary, boring, featureless, destructive nail in the coffin of the old, humane, livable, to-scale East Village, once a real neighborhood for real people, now just a glitzy playground for a bunch of trust funders and tourists who think it's fine to come here and act out, since they know New York, eager to pander for their money, will not hold them responsible for their actions. No consequences = no limits.

I have seriously begun to think that it's time to pack it in. Wonder if Marty Wombacher wants company in Peoria?!?

Anonymous said...

No hospitals. No housing. But plenty of bars and transient hotels.
Whoo

Anonymous said...

East Villagers are also to blame. The majority of HDFC co-op shareholders in the East Village have abused the system by using the flip tax to upscale the buildings and selling them to cash buyers.

Luxury developments and upscaling is good for people who own apartments, including the HDFC co-ops, because it raises the Area Median Income (AMI). De Blasio should not only regulate the HDFC co-ops to keep them affordable, he should lower the AMI percentage on them and any other affordable housing.

If the HDFC shareholders want to sell their apartments on the open market they should opt out of the program and stop taking subsidies with my tax payer dollars which are supposed to be going to affordable home ownership.

Anonymous said...

@1:59pm: If it doesn't work out as a hotel, maybe it'll become a DORM! Because these things have a way of happening here...

Anonymous said...

@Gojira 2:04pm: You have summed it up quite accurately. And it sucks that this is happening to what was (and should still be) a vibrant and genuine NEIGHBORHOOD of people who don't move in/out every (a) 24 hours, (b) every 9 months, (c) every 2 years. In real neighborhoods, people live there for many years, sometimes raising their families there, and there is a shared history and a concern for quality of life. That concern for quality of life is UTTERLY missing from all recent changes to the puke-sodden East Village.

NYC government should just designate a pier on the West side as "Party Land" and all the woo-hoo's should go there (and take a hotel with them) - party like you're 18 years old and vomit all over but all the noise, disruption, fights, screaming, etc. are CONTAINED in ONE location away from normal neighborhoods.

Anonymous said...

Just the name is gross even.

Anonymous said...

@5:24pm: "East Villagers are also to blame." What??? What do HDFC co-op buildings have to do with what's happening on 11th St. between 4th & 3rd Avenues? Your comment makes no sense relevant to the topic of this thread.

dina tarhan said...

Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll

Anonymous said...

Wifi hogs and designer hot dogs warm over priced beer give us a break along with Cabs 24/7

Gojira said...

By dragging such a totally unrelated issue into this thread, 5:24 shows that s/he obviously has some fetishistic fixation with HDFCs and the supposedly large-scale selling off of apartments for massive amounts of money. Yes there are occasional abuses - show me any kind of program where there are not - but overall the HDFC program was one of the major stabilizers of what was a dangerous, dirty (but wonderful nonetheless) neighborhood. I'm guessing whoever s/he is, s/he would not have moved down here when so many of us made the decision to wade into abandoned buildings that had no electricity, water, heat, windows, toilets, sinks, stoves, refrigerators, where plumbing and heat risers had been ripped out of walls and floors to sell for scrap, leaving gaping holes for the wind to whistle through, years worth of garbage had piled up, dead boilers sat useless in basements, drainpipes were clogged with human waste where junkies had used them as latrines since the crappers had been destroyed to get to the pipes, roofs leaked every time it rained - and battle to save those spaces, living in squalid conditions that at times bordered on the surreal in order to do so. Reserve your ire, 5:24, for a city administration that stands idly by while massive amounts of stable housing stock are sold for REAL obscene prices so it can be torn down to make way for crap like the Moxie Hotel, or while senior housing is illegally turned into luxury condos. But as far as HDFCs go, seriously, just STFU.

Anonymous said...

@9:22 Because affordable housing was demolished to make way for the Moxy Hotel and because people on the string are talking about a lack of affordable long term stable housing as it relates to Mayor DeBlasio and demographic changes.

There are approximately 100 HDFC buildings in the East village, mostly in 10009. So if you are wondering why there are so many snotty young people with disposable cash in Alphabet City, it's partly because HDFC shareholders are targeting them.

There have been abuses to buildings in the HDFC program with regards to income restrictions which shareholders have been able to get around by marketing the co-ops to young people whose parents can afford to pay the initial cost and set them up. They market the East village as a place of vibrancy with bars and restaurants and so much to do. They allow for gifting, push for all cash transactions, have generous subletting policies, making it unaffordable to most people in the neighborhood.

As much as I am no fan of DeBlasio it appears that the city is trying to reform the HDFC program to preserve it as affordable housing and yet many HDFC's in the East Village are fighting this plan because they want to be able to sell to the highest bidder. I'm just trying to show the hypocrisy on their part and that if that's the way they feel then they should STFU.

Anonymous said...

Moxy is a boutique hotel with the social heart of a hostel. A free-spirited place where you can do all that crazy fun stuff you’d never think of doing at home, together with likeminded spirits you’d otherwise never have met.

TRANSLATION: This is an overpriced establishment run by amateurs for lost wanderers. A place with no rules where you can act out every childish or foolish thought you had in your head that if your mother or grandmother caught you at it, you would find yourself confined to your room with way too many delusional teenagers and no bathroom privileges for a month.

Yeah...that is exactly NOT the type of place I would want to stay in when I come to NYC.

Anonymous said...

> ... sadly, many of our building residents and/or transient 'neighbors' already behave like this from Thursday night through Monday a.m. (and we are one block from the hotel site). Fun!

Anonymous said...

I think they have to market the Moxy to free-spirited no-rules types (until guests start breaking the furniture) because who else is going to want to vacation across the street from Webster Hall? What happens in the EV, stays in the EV.

Anonymous said...

NYC is overrated, and I'm a lifelong New Yorker.

1980s NYC > 1990s NYC > 2000s NYC > 2010s NYC

Prove otherwise. I need a laugh.

Btw what happened in 2007 NYC? Besides long lines for the first iPhone?

2010? 2014?

I ❤️ NY said...

Right, New York is so overrated, until you get to London and find out the underground shuts down at midnight, most of the food sucks, or is wildly overpriced with tiny portions, alcoholism is rampant, and everyone smokes and has bad teeth. Or any Midwestern city where they roll up the sidewalks at sundown. Or LA where you're stuck in traffic for half your life on the 405, people don't walk unless they are at the mall, no one reads books or magazines, and every wildfire is followed by a major mudslide. Or Chicago, where you freeze your ass off all winter and sweat your butt off all summer. Or Rio de Janeiro where if you walk two blocks in the wrong way you're bound to be kidnapped or robbed at gunpoint, and that's by the police. Or maybe Paris, where everyone hates you because you're American, where their specialty is making the pizzas topped with Brie, and now matter how fluent you are your French isn't ever good enough. Or Greece, unemployment is the national pastime. Or Cairo, where the price of anything doubles when they find out you're American, and if you're female and traveling alone you are likely to either be harassed, drugged, sexually assaulted or all three. And then there is Hong Kong, Shanghai or Beijing, where police regularly snatch people off the street right next to you, never to be seen again, and the smog is so bad you can't go outside some days . How about any major city in India, where you choke from the smell from the raw sewage running through the street, and there's poverty on a scale like you've never seen before. Or you could head out to America's heartland, where everyone is armed, with rednecks driving trucks, ready to run you off the road if you're in any kind of minority. Yeah, New York really sucks, until you travel to a few dozen countries like I have and to over 100 cities, plus places in between,
and then you find out that New York doesn't suck so much after all. And if you don't like it, you can
always go back to Ohio. Or move. We could use another vacant apartment.

Anonymous said...

This is true, 10:36.

Let it be said, though, apropos of nothing, that Iggy Pop moved to Miami, and likes it! ;-)