Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Bird watch: A nesting American robin on 3rd Street and Avenue B



An American robin recently built a nest on the fire escape outside David Browning's window on Third Street near Avenue B ... and this past weekend, two of the eggs hatched.

David shared these photos that he took during the last few days...









"I feel lucky these robins picked my fire escape for their nest," said Browning, who has lived in the building for 16 years. "It’s really awesome to watch unfold."

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Beautiful!

Edmund Dunn said...

Great shots, made my day, thank you David.

Anonymous said...

look at the size of that open beak! this is incredible! thank you for sharing!

Gojira said...

David, you can buy bags of dried mealworms at Petco in Union Square, and if you put little piles of them on a plate on your fire escape, it will give Mom a good food source for herself and her babies. I have a robin who comes to my fire escape daily for a snack, they love them. Enjoy the wonderful show!

Goggla said...

What a beautiful sight!

Anonymous said...

Awwww ! How beautiful and lucky for David !
__________________________________________________________________
Petland ( 20th St 1st Ave ) Stuy Town side - sells live
mealworms ( 2.44 portion), wax worms ( .10 cents each), etc.
Cheaper than Petco and PetSmart.
Good prices on seeds.


Anonymous said...

That is awesome. Thanks for sharing it with us .

Ade said...

Nice tweet

editrrix said...

This is soooooo awesome! The photographs are amazing. So cool and life affirming. Thanks for the much-needed break from our national nightmare.

DrGecko said...

Not dinosaurs, no, not dinosaurs at all.

Those are NOT dinosaurs.


[grumble]

JQ LLC said...

Bart Jr. and Chirpy Boy.

Anonymous said...

To photograph wildlife this close, cut a hole or several for your camera in a sheet of black poster board that fits your entire window. Tape the poster board flat on the window.

You can then photograph through the apertures you've cut in the poster board without disturbing the wildlife.

This is one of the methods wildlife photographers use all the time.

Thank you for the beautiful photos. We look forward to seeing more of this little family.