Wednesday, March 28, 2012

316 E. Third St. has been demolished

Back in May 2010, this ivy-covered townhouse between Avenue C and Avenue D hit the market for $3.995 million... We knew was in store at first glimpse of the listing:

The townhouse itself is not landmarked, and there are approximately 22,900 buildable square feet available to the purchaser of these combined 2 lots, offering myriad opportunities for creative expansion.


Preservation groups to try to protect the circa-1835 house, but the Landmarks Preservation Commission rejected a hearing... setting up the new home for a Karl Fischer-designed, 33-unit apartment building...

Workers started prepping the house for demolition on Feb. 7. And, as you probably figured from the headline, the house is gone. Here's how it looked last evening.





...and the view from Houston...


According to the DOB, the city has yet to approve the plans for the new apartment building. DOB officials disapproved the plans on March 12.

Previously on EV Grieve:
33-unit, Karl Fischer-designed building rising at former home of Community Board 3 member

Landmarks Preservation Commission rejects hearing for 316 E. Third St., paving way for 7-floor condo

Lovely townhouse with bucolic gardens on East Third Street ready for "creative expansion"

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Oh, good. So we get an empty lot for over a year instead.

melaniemusings2 said...

another one bites the dusk...sad

Anonymous said...

Sad. A place dating back to 1835. It may not have been historic, but it had history.

blue glass said...

stupid stupid stupid
i'd call it criminal
rest in peace

Anonymous said...

Disgusting.

Anonymous said...

Ugh! I had to scroll over this real fast. I can't face another tear down!

Anonymous said...

Seems strange that you can tear down a perfectly good building creating an eyesore without plans to build anything else approved yet. Without these shenanigans we wouldn't have things like this or The Mystery Lot. Very sad.

Anonymous said...

There seems to be very little oversight on the DOB's part. There's a thing called Directive 14, which allows architects and engineers to self certify projects. This was done in 1975 in an effort to ease congestion in the DOB. Anybody else see what's wrong with that?

Anonymous said...

How does a house that old not have landmark status? And why do they tear it down before their planned building is even approved.

Uncle Waltie said...

New York should tear down every last remnant of its historic past. Just like they do in Paris, London, Zurich and Rome.

Anonymous said...

pretty sad!!

glamma said...

f*ck i cant believe it, what an
ARCHITECTURAL CRIME

posted by Penelope @ said...

Another sad and unnecessary loss. Why can't people see that whatever you build in its place, the craft is gone? We will never have that level of artisanship in buildings again (and not many people care, judging from the millions of hideous condos they build and buy nowadays). Brave new world... not.