Showing posts with label 20 St. Mark's Place. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 20 St. Mark's Place. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 26, 2022

A new broker for 20 St. Mark's Place

Our favorite building to write about here!

Workers recently removed the plywood after eight months from outside 20 St. Mark's Place between Second Avenue and Third Avenue... and, late last week, yet another for lease sign (for a different broker) arrived on the long-empty retail spaces...  hopefully, you can see the sign! 
The dear, old Grassroots Tavern closed in the lower space after service on New Year's Eve 2017... ending a 42-year run on the block. The upstairs retail tenant, Sounds, shut down in October 2015, and the spaces have been vacant ever since. 

As noted many times before, No. 20the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Past lives of this subterranean space — via Daytonian in Manhattan — include a theater-saloon called Paul Falk's Tivoli Garden in the 1870s... in the 1930s, the Hungarian Cafe and Restaurant resided here before becoming a temperance saloon called the Growler.

After the Grassroots closed, Bob Precious tried to open a bar-pub here, but those plans never materialized after 18 months. 

Applicants for Ichibantei had been on the CB3-SLA agenda multiple times dating to November 2018 for a liquor license for a new restaurant in the former Sounds storefront. There was speculation that they were also taking the GR space.

And in recent years, we've seen some extensive gut renovations occurring inside the former Grassroots, where some pretty cool murals were uncovered from a previous business life. 

Meanwhile, the new retail listing for No. 20 is at this link.


Wednesday, July 7, 2021

Retail space on the market at 20 St. Mark's Place

A new retail-restaurant for lease banner hangs on 20 St. Mark's Place between Second Avenue and Third Avenue.

We've been wondering what might be happening with this landmarked building. Hard to believe that the Grassroots Tavern has been gone this long already, closing after service on New Year’s Eve 2017... ending a 42-year run in the lower space. The upstairs retail tenant, Sounds, shut down in October 2015.

As noted many times before, No. 20known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Past lives of this subterranean space — via Daytonian in Manhattan — include a theater-saloon called Paul Falk's Tivoli Garden in the 1870s... in the 1930s, the Hungarian Cafe and Restaurant resided here before becoming a temperance saloon called the Growler.

After the Grassroots closed, Bob Precious tried to open a bar-pub here, but those plans never materialized after 18 months. 

Applicants for Ichibantei had been on the CB3-SLA agenda multiple times dating to November 2018 for a liquor license for a new restaurant in the former Sounds storefront. There was speculation that they were also taking the GR space.

And in recent years, we've seen some extensive gut renovations occurring inside the former Grassroots, where some pretty cool murals were uncovered from a previous business life. 

Meanwhile, the new retail listing for No. 20 isn't online just yet. 


Thursday, January 2, 2020

RIP Kitty at the former Grassroots Tavern


[Photo by Steven]

Kitty, a regular of the former Grassroots Tavern at 20 St. Mark’s Place, recently died. Someone created a memorial in his honor outside the space ... which still sits empty after the Grassroots closed after service on New Year’s Eve 2017...


[NYE 2017 photo by Peter Brownscombe]

As noted many times before, No. 20, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832 here between Second Avenue and Third Avenue. (It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.)

Past lives of this subterranean space — via Daytonian in Manhattan — include a theater-saloon called Paul Falk's Tivoli Garden in the 1870s... in the 1930s, the Hungarian Cafe and Restaurant resided here before becoming a temperance saloon called the Growler.

Who's next? We don't know. For nearly 18 months Bob Precious had tried to open a bar-pub here, but those plans never materialized.

Applicants for Ichibantei have been on the CB3-SLA agenda dating to November 2018 for a liquor license for a new restaurant in the former Sounds storefront upstairs. There was speculation that they were also taking the GR space. Ichibantei was once again on the January CB3-SLA agenda, but scratched.

In any event, this is a retail space to watch in the New Year.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

Behold these murals uncovered behind the bar at the former Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Thursday, June 27, 2019

How about another look inside the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place


[EVG photo]

Work continues inside the graffiti-filled lower storefront at the landmarked 20 St. Mark's Place, previously home to the Grassroots Tavern.



EVG contributor Derek Berg checked in on the state of those murals that workers recently uncovered inside the space — still there...



We wrote about these murals on May 21. We don't know much about them or what pre-Grassroots business they were associated with.

Here's a reminder:





As noted many times before, No. 20, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832 here between Second Avenue and Third Avenue. (It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.)

Past lives of this subterranean space — via Daytonian in Manhattan — include a theater-saloon called Paul Falk's Tivoli Garden in the 1870s... in the 1930s, the Hungarian Cafe and Restaurant resided here before becoming a temperance saloon called the Growler.

Who's next? We don't know. For nearly 18 months Bob Precious had tried to open a bar-pub here, but those plans never materialized. The space was recently taken off the rental market.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

Behold these murals uncovered behind the bar at the former Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Behold these murals uncovered behind the bar at the former Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place


[EVG photo from last week]

Workers continue to gut the subterranean space at 20 St. Mark's Place where the Grassroots Tavern was for 42 years (1975-2017).

And late last week, EVG contributor Derek Berg got a look inside at the murals that were discovered on the wall when workers ripped out the bar ...









We don't know how old these are. As we recall, the Grassroots space was previously a Greek restaurant. (If any pre-1975 historians or former GR employees want to chime in about these murals.)

The address, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. (It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.)

-----

Updated 10 a.m.

Thanks to Gar for this link to Daytonian in Manhattan with a post on the history of the building:

By 1931 the house was home to the Hungarian Cafe and Restaurant. An incident there on July 1 reflected the gangster-driven atmosphere of the East Village in the Depression Era.

Abe Rothbard was playing cards in the cafe that night. Police later noted he had a criminal record. Patrons noticed an unknown man open the door and motion for Rothbard to go outside. When he reached the door, the man beckoned him to step further out on the sidewalk.

The Times reported "He followed him to the stoop and then four shots were fired by a third man from the sidewalk. Rothbard fell, seriously wounded." The mysterious attackers escaped.

At the beginning of the Depression, Urbain Ledoux had opened The Tub, a homeless shelter, in the old Schuetzen Hall down the block at No. 12 St. Mark's Place. Ledoux, known to the men he helped as “Mr. Zero,” accommodated 135 homeless men on cots and steamer chairs. He advertised “auctions” of the men’s services in order to find them temporary work. On New Year’s Day 1929, over two thousand homeless men ate dinner there. The line outside was unbroken from early morning through the afternoon.

The year following the hit on Abe Rothbard, Ledoux took over the Hungarian Cafe. On January 3, 1932 The Times reported "Urbain Ledoux, who prefers to be called 'Mr. Zero,' announced yesterday that he would open a week from today a temperance saloon to be known a the 'Growler' at 20 St. Mark's Place. He intends to sell in it near-beer for 3 cents a glass; baked beans, soup, pudding, bread, pies and cake at 1 cent an order." Down-and-out men could "take their ease and play dominoes, checkers or cards, or read the newspapers."

-----

Also late last week, EVG reader and GR regular Eskapee took possession of part of the former Grassroots sign (a worker was putting it out for the taking).



Meanwhile, as we noted last week, the space has been on the retail market. This apparently brought an end to the nearly 18 months Bob Precious had spent trying to open a bar-pub here.

In an email on Friday, Precious provided a recap about what happened to his venture, tentatively called Subterranean:

Essentially, the landlord was not able to deliver the space to us. We waited almost a year and a half from the time we signed our lease for them to complete their work and, as of April 1 of this year, they were not able to commit to a date when their work would be done.

It could easily have been a two-year total wait — an impossible situation for a small company to be in. We had fixed costs — salaries for two employees hired specifically to spearhead that project, and had paid professional fees — designer, legal, structural engineer and HVAC, and could not rationalize staying in any longer. A sad situation for us because we believed in the bar and the location.

There are several unsubstantiated rumors making the rounds about the building between Second Avenue and Third Avenue, including that a new tenant has been signed for the old Grassroots space — for an unspecified Asian-style eatery.

What is known, however, is that the place needs a lot of work. Steven took these photos yesterday... showing the old GR bar sink going off to parts unknown...



... and a look inside ...



Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

Thursday, May 16, 2019

The former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place is on the market



In recent weeks various tipsters have told us that the former Grassroots Tavern at 20 St. Mark's Place was now available for rent.

As proof, there's an updated retail listing for the space between Second Avenue and Third Avenue...



The asking rent is available upon request, per the listing.

This also must mean that the new bar slated for the old Grassroots spot isn't moving forward. For the past 18-plus months, Bob Precious had been planning on opening a bar in this semi-subterranean space with a working title of Subterranean.

Precious launched the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man, including the one on 36th Street. CB3 OK'd his new liquor license for 20 St. Mark's Place in December 2017.

He told us said last August that the former Grassroots space was in bad shape — including structural damage. The approvals for the renovations in the landmarked building had been slow going. In November, Previous was hoping for a spring opening.

He did not respond to an email about this latest development. Updated: Precious confirmed that he is no longer taking the space. We'll have more about that in another post.

Meanwhile, gut renovations continue inside the space that was, for 42 years, home of the Grassroots until New Year's Eve 2017.

Jim Stratton, the longtime principal owner of the Grassroots, sold the business in 2017. In January 2016, Stratton sold the building to Klosed Properties for a reported $5.6 million.

The address, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Today, the front of the former Grassroots is covered in graffiti.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

A quick look inside the former Grassroots Tavern


[20 St. Mark's Place as seen last week]

The door was open yesterday at the former Grassroots Tavern, 20 St. Mark's Place between Second Avenue and Third Avenue.

EVG Open Door Correspondent Steven looked inside the under-renovation space...



For starters, a good chunk of the long bar is currently MIA ...



Otherwise, the place doesn't look too different, with that fall-through-the-floor-at-any-moment vibe intact! (We kid because we loved the Grassroots.)

No one was around to ask about the status of the work inside this landmarked building.

A quickie recap on what's going on here: Approved permits are on file for repair work in the lower retail space, the longtime home of the Grassroots until New Year's Eve 2017.

As we've been reporting, Bob Precious is planning on opening a bar in this semi-subterranean space with a working title of Subterranean. (Precious operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man, including the one on 36th Street. CB3 OK'd his new liquor license in December 2017.)

Precious said last August that the former Grassroots space was in bad shape — including structural damage. The approvals for the renovations in the landmarked building had been slow going. (In November, Previous was hoping for a spring opening.)

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Renovations underway in the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place



After nearly 14 months of inactivity at 20 St. Mark's Place, workers are now on the scene here between Second Avenue and Third Avenue... a concrete crew has been spotted in recent days (all photos from yesterday via Steven...)





The interior doesn't look too different from when it was the Grassroots Tavern (KIDDING)...



A quickie recap on what's going on here: Approved permits are now on file for repair work in the lower retail space, the longtime home of the Grassroots Tavern until New Year's Eve 2017.

As we've been reporting, Bob Precious is planning on opening a bar in this semi-subterranean space with a working title of Subterranean. (Precious operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man, including the one on 36th Street. CB3 OK'd his new liquor license in December 2017.)

Precious said last August that the former Grassroots space was in bad shape — including structural damage. The approvals for the renovations in the landmarked building had been slow going, for whatever reasons. (In November, Previous was hoping for a spring opening.)

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Since the Grassroots closed, people keep tagging the former bar's entrance.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

This is what's happening with the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place

The former Grassroots Tavern ready for a renovation

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

The current state of 20 St. Mark's Place


[Photos Sunday by Steven]

The building between Second Avenue and Third Avenue was tagged multiple times Saturday night/Sunday morning...



A quickie recap on what's going on here: Approved permits are now on file for repair work in the retail space at 20 St. Mark's Place, the longtime home of the Grassroots Tavern until New Year's Eve 2017.

As we've been reporting, Bob Precious is planning on opening a bar in this semi-subterranean space with a working title of Subterranean. (Precious operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man, including the one on 36th Street. CB3 OK'd his new liquor license in December 2017.)

Precious said last August that the former Grassroots space was in bad shape — including structural damage. The approvals for the renovations in the landmarked building had been slow going, for whatever reasons. (In November, Previous was hoping for a spring opening.)

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Since the Grassroots closed, people keep tagging the former bar's entrance.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

This is what's happening with the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place

The former Grassroots Tavern ready for a renovation

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

The former Grassroots Tavern ready for a renovation


[Photo from Saturday]

While on the topic of landmarked buildings on St. Mark's Place between Second Avenue and Third Avenue... approved permits are now on file for repair work in the retail space at 20 St. Mark's Place, the longtime home of the Grassroots Tavern until New Year's Eve 2017.

The city OK'd the permits just after the New Year. Per the DOB's ALL-CAP style: REPLACE 8 EXISTING DAMAGE WOOD JOISTS WITH STEEL I BEAM W10X33. REPAIR FLOOR AND CEILING AT BASEMENT AND 1ST FLOOR. STRUCTURAL WORK AS PER PLAN.

As we've been reporting, Bob Precious is planning on opening a bar in this semi-subterranean space with a working title of Subterranean. (Precious operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man, including the one on 36th Street. CB3 OK'd his new liquor license in December 2017.)

Precious said last August that the former Grassroots space was in bad shape — including structural damage. The approvals for the renovations in the landmarked building had been slow going, for whatever reasons. (In November, Previous was hoping for a spring opening.)

Applicants for Ichibantei were on the November CB3-SLA agenda for a liquor license for a new restaurant in the former Sounds space upstairs. However, they withdrew the application before the meeting.

Jim Stratton, the longtime principal owner of the Grassroots, the tenant here for 42 years, decided to sell the business in 2017. In January 2016, Stratton sold the building to Klosed Properties for a reported $5.6 million.

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Since the Grassroots closed, someone has tagged the bar entrance multiple times.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

This is what's happening with the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place

Ichibantei vying for 20 St. Mark's Place, and an update on the former Grassroots Tavern space

Monday, November 19, 2018

Ichibantei vying for 20 St. Mark's Place, and an update on the former Grassroots Tavern space



Applicants for Ichibantei are on tonight's CB3-SLA agenda for a liquor license for a new restaurant in the former Sounds space at 20 St Mark's Place between Second Avenue and Third Avenue.

The questionnaire (find the PDF at this link) for the Japanese restaurant shows 28 tables seating 56 guests as well as a bar for eight. The proposed hours are 11:30 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday, with a 2 a.m. closure on Friday and Saturday.


[Click on image for more detail]

An application for the space from the same principal(s) has been on the CB3-SLA agenda several times dating to 2017, though it has been withdrawn in each instance for unspecified reasons. The questionnaire on file at the CB3 website does not mention if this would be a second outpost for Ichibantei, the eight-year-old Japanese comfort-food spot on 13th Street between Avenue A and First Avenue, or a spin-off location.

Sounds closed in October 2015 after 36 years in business selling records, tapes and CDs.

Tonight's CB3-SLA committee meeting starts at 6:30 in the Public Hotel, 17th Floor, Sophia Room, 215 Chrystie St. between Houston and Stanton.

------

While on the topic of 20 St. Mark's Place... in August, I exchanged emails with Bob Precious, who's planning on opening a bar in this semi-subterranean space with a working title of Subterranean. (Precious operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man, including the one on 36th Street. CB3 OK'd his new liquor license back in December.)

In August, he hoped to be up and running this fall. He noted at the time that the bar space was in bad shape — including structural damage — when he received the keys. The newish landlord needed to get the approvals for the renovations in this landmarked building. This process has proven to be slow going.

I asked Precious for an update last week. He said that the landlord claims to be starting their structural work "soon."

"If so, we'll finally be able to start our work ... and could have an early spring opening," he said in an email. "That would be about 15 months since we took over; ridiculous and frustrating, since we're not really doing that much."

For comparison, the 36th Street outpost of the Ginger Man, which is 2.5 times as big as the No. 20 space, was built from scratch in six months before it opened early 1996, he said.

The Grassroots Tavern closed after service on New Year's Eve after 42 years here.

Jim Stratton, the longtime principal owner, decided to sell the business last year. In January 2016, Stratton sold the building to Klosed Properties for a reported $5.6 million.

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

This is what's happening with the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place

Thursday, August 9, 2018

This is what's happening with the former Grassroots Tavern space on St. Mark's Place



The Grassroots Tavern closed its doors on New Year's Eve after 42 years at 20 St. Mark's Place.

Jim Stratton, the longtime principal owner of the semi-subterranean space here between Second Avenue and Third Avenue, decided to sell the business last year. (In January 2016, Stratton sold the building to Klosed Properties for a reported $5.6 million.)

Bob Precious, who operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called the Ginger Man (including the one on 36th Street), now owns the bar space. (CB3 OK'd his new liquor license back in December.)

Meanwhile, not much, if anything, has happened here in the lower level of the landmarked building in recent months. There were even whispers from the old guard at the Grassroots that the plans for the new venture fell through.

I asked Precious for an update.

"The bar is moving forward, albeit at an agonizingly slow pace," he told me via email.

Precious said that the bar space was in bad shape — including structural damage — when he received the keys.

"As landlords are responsible for structural work, the usual work that falls to a new tenant/operator has been held up while we wait for them to deal with their end of things," Precious said. "It has meant more than the usual amount of filings with the Department of Buildings, and, since the space is in a landmarked building, you have another layer of filings with the Landmarks Preservation Commission."

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

According to public records, the DOB approved the the plan exam for the work in the lower level, which includes replacing "three existing damaged wood joists with steel I-beams, repair floor and ceiling at basement," just yesterday.

"We thought we were taking over a fully functional, operating bar needing a good clean up and some minor repairs, but are now involved in something like a restoration," Precious said. "The irony is that we liked the look and feel — to a point — of the previous bar, and had wanted to keep most of that intact."

In any event, Precious is still hoping for a opening later this fall. The location will not be another outpost of the Ginger Man — "except in a continued devotion to good beer. And whiskey and, hopefully, wine."

"The name, at the moment, is Subterranean, after the Kerouac book, more or less," he said. "If get through this permitting hell, we plan on having a real kitchen — the Ginger Man doesn't — so the food will be more interesting. Jazz once a week, like [at the] Grassroots, is also part of the plan."

Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Last call at the Grassroots Tavern

Thursday, May 31, 2018

The sad state of the former Grassroots Tavern


[Photo from Monday]

I talked with a fewer former regulars of the Grassroots Tavern at 20 St. Mark's Place who are disappointed in the state of affairs outside the landmarked building between Second Avenue and Third Avenue.

The front of the bar, which closed on New Year's Eve after 42 years here, was recently tagged ... the handrail is broken ...



... and it looks as if someone took a jackhammer to the area outside the door...



... and the plant in the front window that was dead when the bar was open is now really dead...



In January 2016, Klosed Properties bought 20 St. Mark's Place from Jim Stratton, who was also the majority owner of the Grassroots.

Bob Precious, who operates the mini chain of Irish-style pubs called The Ginger Man (including the one on 36th Street), is the new owner of the former Grassroots space.

An EVG reader who lives near No. 20 reports that she hasn't seen anyone enter the bar space in several months.

To date, there haven't been any new work permits filed for the address.

However, someone yesterday did begin the process of removing the tag from the entryway...



Updated 6/1

After someone removed the tag... another one went up in its place last night...



Previously on EV Grieve:
New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Monday, December 4, 2017

[Updated] New owner lined up for the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place



An applicant is expected to appear before the CB3-SLA committee this month for a new liquor license for the Grassroots Tavern at 20 St. Mark's Place.

According to the questionnaire (PDF here) posted for the public on the CB3 website, the applicant is Richard Precious. The paperwork describes this as "a sale of assets."

Precious started a mini chain of bars called the Ginger Man in Texas in 1985 (named after the J.P. Donleavy novel). He opened a Ginger Man on East 36th Street near Fifth Avenue in 1996. (He sold the Texas bars in 2000. There are also Ginger Man bars in Greenwich and Norwalk, Conn.)

The questionnaire does not specify if the basement-level Grassroots space would be renamed or renovated. There's a mention of food ("casual restaurant fare"). The proposed hours remain roughly the same (4 p.m. to 4 a.m. Monday through Friday instead of the current 3 p.m. to 4 a.m.), but with an earlier start on Saturday and Sunday (1 p.m.). The live jazz performances on Sunday evening will continue, per the questionnaire. (And it looks as if the lone TV will remain.)


[EVG file photo]

No word yet when — or if — the change in ownership will occur and what type of modifications may occur at the Grassroots, which opened here between Second Avenue and Third Avenue in 1975.

As for what might be in store, here's an overview of the NYC Ginger Man via New York magazine:

As much a pub as a Mercedes SUV is a jeep, the Ginger Man feels like Euro Disney's vision of the classic Irish watering hole. Nothing is done in half measures, whether it's the mind-boggling selection of beers and single malts or the JFK, Jr.-look-alike bartenders. And while the clientele is all business during the day, this vision of J. Press heaven loosens its tie and kicks off its heels at night. On a recent visit, suit-and-tie singles, post-MSG sports fans and an impromptu wrap party for an off-Broadway play co-existed peacefully, with more than enough wandering room and cozy corners for all.

A change in the GR status quo isn't a big surprise. In January 2016, Klosed Properties bought the landmarked 20 St. Mark's Place from Jim Stratton, who is also the majority owner of the Grassroots. At that time, a source with some background of the deal said that the bar had a lease for the next five years, with an option after that for renewal.

However, there have been unsubstantiated-to-date rumors in circulation that the current incarnation of the Grassroots would close before the end of its current lease.

Meanwhile, several applicants had been looking at opening a bar-restaurant in the upstairs space that previously housed Sounds. However, those plans never materialized.

The December CB3-SLA committee meeting is Dec. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the Perseverance House Community Room, 535 E. Fifth St. between Avenue A and Avenue B.

Updated 12/7

The bar's Facebook page announced tonight that the Grassroots will close after service on New Year's Eve. More to come...

Previously on EV Grieve:
20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

Thursday, January 14, 2016

20 St. Mark's Place, home of the Grassroots Tavern, has been sold


[Image via LoopNet]

For months now we've been hearing that 20 St. Mark's Place was in the process of being sold.

And now details on the sale of the historic building between Second Avenue and Third Avenue are public. Real Estate Weekly noted last week that Klosed Properties is the new owner. There wasn't any mention of the price. According to public records, it appears that Klosed Properties paid about $5.6 million for the building, which includes a 2nd-floor co-op that also served as an art studio.

We don't know too much about this real-estate company. Among their newer properties in their vast portfolio: 837 Second Ave., which was home until last spring to the original, 90-year-old Palm Restaurant. As several news outlets reported, workers wiped away the Palm's iconic murals and magazine covers that lined the walls last August. Klosed principal Steven Kachanian told The Real Deal the following about the Palm space in August: "We're working with some high-end tenants looking to do some major work to the property."

So what does the sale mean for the lone tenant at No. 20 — the 40-year-plus old Grassroots Tavern? They are staying put. The bar's majority owner, Jim Stratton, also owned the building. According to a source with some background of the deal, the bar has a lease for the next five years... with an option after that for renewal.


[An early morning look at the Grassroots from last month]

The other retail tenant in the building, Sounds, closed in October after 36 years in business. (Sounds owner Brian Fair died in early December after a short stint in the hospital.)

20 St. Mark's Place, known as the Daniel LeRoy House, was built in 1832. It received landmark status in 1971... and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. (Find more history of the Greek Revival house here.)

Previously on EV Grieve:
The last record store on St. Mark's Place is closing

So long Sounds

RIP Brian Fair, owner of Sounds

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Your chance to live in this historic home above the Grassroots Tavern on St. Mark's Place

[Via Wikipedia]

There's a new listing for a home at 20 St. Mark's Place, above one of our favorite places, the Grassroots Tavern ... (and above Sounds) ... and we always forget just how nice the residences are here...

Per the Douglas Elliman listing:

2 beds, 2 baths unit occupying entire second floor.
Apartment features North-South exposures with garden views and partial city views, 12 foot ceilings, formal dining and a grand living space with wide plank hardwood floors throughout, oak moldings, three fireplaces.

Price: $2.1 million. Here are a few photos...





In case you don't know this building's history ... No. 20 is The Daniel LeRoy House, built in 1832 and landmarked in 1969 ... and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. The historical marker out front reads:

This mansion was once part of the row that lined the entire brickfront. With its arched Federal-Barqoue doorway, grand proportions and original wrought iron handrailings at the stoop, it is now a rare survivor of a type, which because of its great cost, was never common. The row, one of the few ever built in this style in New York, was constructed in 1832, by Thomas E. Davis, a speculative builder. No. 20 was purchased by Daniel Leroy, brother-in-law of Hamilton Fish and son-in-law of Nicholas Fish, whose nearby home at 21 Stuyvesant Street is also a landmark.

Something to think about over your next $2 happy hour pint...