Showing posts with label 14th Street. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 14th Street. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Taking a look at the NW corner of 14th Street and 1st Avenue

For starters, ICYMI: Papaya Dog has closed here on the NW corner of First Avenue and 14th Street after 16 years of peddling hot dogs and sandwich combos ... as we first reported back on Thursday. (Thanks to KT and Pinch!)
This corner has been on a watch-list for years ... with the mostly single-level strip of commercial buildings seemingly waiting to be gobbled up for new development. Plus, the four-story 239 First Ave., where the shuttered Salt & Pepper sold Indian and Chinese cuisine from the storefront next to Papaya Dog, remains vacant. 

Anyway, there's nothing in public records to suggest anything is afoot here for the time being.

A lot of people also had feelings about Papaya Dog's departure, especially on Twitter. And there was a lot of conversation about the ongoing issues — fights, drug use, etc. — along this corridor.   

Monday, May 4, 2020

Now that the L-train tunnel work is complete, here's what to expect along 14th Street



ICYMI: On April 26, Gov. Cuomo announced that the Sandy-damaged Canarsie tunnel rehabilitation phase was completed — reportedly several months ahead of schedule and less than $100 million as originally expected.

L trains are now running more frequently on weekends than during the L Project tunnel rehabilitation phase, but service reductions remain.

Now the MTA is focusing on non-tunnel elements, such as the new entrance on 14th Street at Avenue A and the rehabbed station at First Avenue.

The L Project e-newsletter from this past weekend provided an overview of interest to residents and commuters in this neighborhood. Here's a recap of what they had to say (completion dates subject to changes):

• The First Avenue north entrance is expected to open this month with final granite work at the street level scheduled for the fall.

• The First Avenue south entrance opened ahead of schedule last Monday. (The MTA said that the pushed to get it done early given the entrance's proximity to Mount Sinai Beth Israel.) Final work at the street level is scheduled for summer and fall.


[1st Avenue south entrance]

• The new Avenue A north entrance is currently open, with final finishes scheduled for after the completion of the First Avenue north side.

• The Avenue A south entrance is also open. The MTA still needs to complete the granite work. However, officials say that they're keeping this entrance open for the time being given its proximity to the hospital.

• Two street-to-platform elevators at Avenue A on the north and south sides of 14th Street: Estimated completion scheduled for the summer.





• Street restoration along 14th: Paving expected to begin on May 11, pending weather conditions, and the work is estimated to last one week.

Tree planting along 14th Street: Planned to begin on Thursday, pending weather conditions.

• Avenue B-area substation: High-tension power connection expected to occur in May or June.

• Avenue D fan plant: Final work scheduled to be completed in June.

• New escalator at 14th Street-Union Square: Estimated completion is now scheduled for the summer following COVID-19-related contractor delays.

Previously on EV Grieve:
1 weekend down: L-train slowdown recap

Renderings reveal the MTA's plans for the Avenue A L station; why does everyone look so happy?

Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

What the L: Cuomo calls off full L-train shutdown

Thursday, April 9, 2020

14th Street residents enduring construction hell while under stay-at-home orders



For the past two and a half years, residents along 14th Street between Avenue A and Avenue B have endured the ongoing L-train reconstruction. (Read about that here and here.)

Now more construction arrived at the end of March as the NYC Department of Environmental Protection decided to start a (non-emergency) old sewer line repair in the middle of 14th Street between A and B.



Residents of 542 E. 14th St. described the scenario:

The project involves jackhammers, chainsaws, a pipe cutter, several generators/pumps, as well as cranes. The sound is unbearably loud, at times shakes the building, goes on all day, including weekends, and is expected to continue for several weeks.

The result is that, while we are stuck inside our homes upon the order of the governor because of the pandemic, we are being forced to endure incredibly loud and disruptive non-emergency work on the part of the DEP. This is cruel and is completely outside the spirit of solidarity we need right now. Everyone is trying to do their part in staying sane and calm during this ongoing crisis, and yet we are being tortured by unnecessary repair work.

According to the residents, the "worst" of the work takes place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., though it commences at 7 a.m. and lasts until 3 p.m.

Below is a three-second sampling of what goes on for hours...



Back to the residents: "This is a real 'screw you' to the community, especially after we've endured two and a half years of the ongoing MTA construction."

Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

Monday, January 6, 2020

L-train construction fence finally comes down on 14th Street — 3 weeks after the Associated closed


[Obscured view of the former Associated from Dec. 14]

The Associated Supermarket on 14th Street in Stuy Town closed in mid-December.

Joseph Falzon, the store’s owner, previously told Crain's that a confluence of factors had cut business nearly in half. For starters, construction on 14th Street for the L-train upgrades obscured the single-level storefront with a 12-foot fence these past two-plus years.

Now, roughly three weeks after the store closed, workers removed that fence from the north side of 14th Street ... offering unobstructed views of the now-shuttered supermarket...







The corner of 14th Street and Avenue A has served as the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction dating back to July 2017.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Trees coming down for L train expansion on 14th Street

Monday, December 9, 2019

Monday's parting shot



A rainy (and car-free!) 14th Street near Union Square this evening... photo via Vinny & O.

Monday, November 11, 2019

A look at the northwest corner of 14th Street and 1st Avenue



The Duane Reade on First Avenue just north of 14th Street closed last Wednesday, one of many DRs around the city to do so.

This (mostly) single-level strip of commercial buildings on the northwest corner has long drawn reader interest ... mostly because someone hasn't gobbled up these properties for new development.

All of the four-story 239 First Ave., where the shuttered Salt & Pepper sold Indian and Chinese cuisine from the storefront, is apparently vacant ...



Anyway, there's nothing in public records to suggest anything is afoot here. And a new Japanese restaurant is coming to the former Kambi Ramen House space there next door to O'Hanlon's...



For now it's on the Future Development Site watch. And enjoy Papaya Dog.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

In the L-Zone: The Little Tree That Could



The following is via the residents of 542 E. 14th St.

Among the many egregious acts the MTA has foisted upon our area is the chainsawing down of all of our old growth trees in the median from the mid block (between Avenues A and B) to Avenue B — except for one tree.

This lone tree survived the chainsawing but is now in peril because its protective fencing is damaged, and the MTA workers are using the space around its trunk to pile brick, pipes, stones, debris and garbage.

After 19 months of work (with no end in sight), this tree has managed to survive the diesel fumes, bulldozing, chainsawing and pollution from this project. It's the Little Tree That Could.

We think the tree deserves to survive and thought it is also a good metaphor for the damage that's been inflicted on our few blocks. The tree, and our neighborhood, deserve better.



Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

Friday, March 15, 2019

Report: MTA commits to a shorter work day for the 14th Street L-train rehab


[EVG file photo]

Residents along 14th Street between Avenue B and First Avenue may now have less evening L-train construction noise to endure.

As Town & Village reports, the MTA has agreed to reduce the hours of operation as it continues to prep for the L-train slowdown next month.

Per their report:

Neighbors have said work often ends at 11 p.m. on weekdays and Saturdays, although the MTA has said it tries to stop any noisy work by 10 p.m. But on Tuesday night, the MTA’s chief development officer overseeing the project, Janno Lieber, committed to stopping work by 7 p.m. at a meeting held by Community Board 3’s Transportation Committee.

“We’re constantly looking for ways to minimalize the impact of our work on neighbors, and they understandably have been asking for shorter hours,” Shams Tarek, a spokesperson for the MTA, told Town & Village.

Tarek added that the MTA wanted to first consult the contractor to make sure doing this wouldn’t lengthen the duration of the project, which includes the creation of an Avenue A entrance to the First Avenue L station. The new schedule of 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday to Friday, with possibly shorter hours on Saturday is effective immediately.

Other L-train details are still being decided, such as the possibility of exit-only stations at First and Third Avenues once the L-train slowdown officially starts later next month.

Meanwhile, on the topic of the L-train work along this corridor... a resident who lives adjacent to the construction zone, recently shared these videos from 8 p.m., showing that not everyone on the site may be all that busy after hours ...

In the first one, the operator of this diesel hydraulic excavator attempts to right a tipped rubber trash can...



...and here's the excavator trying to be a broom...



... and not sure what's happening here...



Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

From bad to pretty bad: MTA releases more details on the new L-train rehab plan

Thursday, February 21, 2019

The foot race to beat the M14 along 14th Street


Transit advocates, out to show how slow city buses are, organized a contest yesterday morning in which pedestrians power-walked on the sidewalk as they followed an M14 on 14th Street from Avenue A to the west side of Union Square.

In the end, the bus won the race — by five seconds.

Per Gothamist:

"For New York City in 2019 to have a bus going walking speed on a good day is really nothing to celebrate," said Tom DeVito, senior director of advocacy at Transportation Alternatives, which organized the contest. He noted that that car traffic was less paralyzing than usual, likely due to school being out this week.

The M14 has been found to be the city's third slowest, as well as one of its busiest, with a daily ridership of 30,000.

With the L-train slowdown coming, the buses along 14th Street could get even slower.

The MTA/DOT have already taken the first steps to make 14th Street a car-free busway for most of the day. However, with the shutdown called off, the MTA said last week that a busway along this stretch isn't necessary.


You can find more coverage at Newsradio 880 ... NBC 4 ... Metro New York ... and NY1.

Thursday, December 20, 2018

City continues 14th Street prep work ahead of the L-train closure


[14th Street at 4th Avenue looking east yesterday]

In recent weeks, I've noted how the city continues to prep 14th Street for its expanded role during the 15-month L-train closure next spring, including the markings for the Select Bus Service (SBS) lane between First Avenue and Third Avenue and the arrival of the dedicated bike lanes on 12th Street and 13th Street.

As previously reported, 14th Street will serve as a (mostly) car free busway for displaced subway commuters.

In an article posted Tuesday, Crain's (HT KT!) pointed out the latest alteration: red traffic lanes at 14th Street intersections between Third Avenue and Ninth Avenue, "which will signal that motorists must exit."

To Crain's:

By April, white Bus Only wording will be stenciled in the black boxes to make the message clear. Similar restricted lanes are planned for Delancey Street between the Williamsburg Bridge and the Bowery.

You can kind of see the full effect in this dodging-traffic shot...



And next?

Also to come are pedestrian walkways on 14th Street to relieve jammed sidewalks, as well as designated curbside loading zones for businesses.

This is what that plan (unveiled this past summer) looks like via the city...



Meanwhile, here's (part of) the area in front of the future tech hub, which will be a construction zone starting in the first quarter of 2019 ... likely making 14th Street even more stressed...



Back to Crain's:

The storm-related repairs to the East River crossing could drive 275,000 daily underground commuters to ground level at 14th Street, where the city plans to direct cars from the thoroughfare and run 80 buses per hour.

This SBS service launches on Sunday, April 21.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

Prepping for the new protected bike lanes on 12th and 13th streets

Bike lane line work continues on 12th Street

1st signs of the 14th Street SBS lane

More signs of the 14th Street SBS lanes

Monday, November 26, 2018

There's improved pedestrian access for businesses along the L-train construction corridor


[EVG photo from September]

There is improved pedestrian access now on the south side of 14th Street between Avenue A and First Avenue, the main construction zone leading up to, and during, the L-train rehab.

As the above photo from September shows, access to the five businesses west of Avenue A was limited to two feet-plus of unappealing sidewalk space that came to a dead end outside the Domino's Pizza outpost.

Meanwhile, most of the pedestrian traffic was diverted to the temporary sidewalk passage set up between the active construction site for creating entrances and exits for the L train at Avenue A and the two lanes of 14th Street.


[EVG photo from June]

The past week, however, the sidewalk situation was reconfigured on the south side of 14th Street... where pedestrians can now walk along the storefronts and away from traffic...



The sidewalk is now a little wider ...



... and you can still walk on it to First Avenue and beyond...





A positive step, though it may be too late — five businesses have already closed between Avenue A and First Avenue... while other retailers and restaurants report a decrease in revenue.

Per an article from The Villager on Nov. 15:

The employees at the Red Apple Barbershop, west of the string of shuttered shops, fear the 10-year-old shop could be next.

“Most of the foot traffic is on the road,” said Michael Vostok, the shop’s manager. The street pattern for construction sends passersby into a pathway in the streets and makes it difficult for Stuyvesant Town residents — critical clientele for the retailers — to both see and reach the shop.

The work here on this part of 14th Street started in July 2017 ahead of the L-train closure between Bedford Avenue and Eighth Avenue that starts on April 27, 2019.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

Renderings reveal the MTA's plans for the Avenue A L station; why does everyone look so happy?

A look at the new L-train renderings along 14th Street

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

More signs of the 14th Street SBS lanes



The city continues to prep 14th Street for its expanded role during the L-train closure next spring. Last week the markings went down for the eastbound Select Bus Service (SBS) lane between First Avenue and Third Avenue...







The westbound lanes are already in place (as noted here).

Here are more details, per the MTA:

The M14 SBS will supplement existing M14A and M14D local bus service on 14th Street, making five stops in each direction between First and Tenth Avenues ... Just before the L train tunnel reconstruction project begins, the M14 SBS route will be extended east to the planned Stuyvesant Cove ferry terminal on the East River to accommodate ferry customers from Brooklyn. Once M14 SBS is implemented, combined with the existing 14th Street local bus service and daily high-occupancy vehicle restrictions on most of 14th Street from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m., crosstown buses will be scheduled no more than two minutes apart during peak hours.

This SBS service launches on Sunday, April 21.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

Prepping for the new protected bike lanes on 12th and 13th streets

Bike lane line work continues on 12th Street

1st signs of the 14th Street SBS lane

Monday, November 5, 2018

1st signs of the 14th Street SBS lane



Back on Thursday, the city began to mark the westbound Select Bus Service (SBS) lane on 14th Street between First Avenue and Second Avenue. (Thanks to KT and Pinch for the tip on Thursday!)

This work is happening ahead of the L-train closure that officially starts now on April 27.

As the MTA and DOT announced last week, this SBS service launches on Sunday, April 21 "to allow for customers to sample and become acclimated to new travel options."

"With DOT crews now putting down new street markings for bus lanes and bike lanes, we are deeply committed to having our streets ready for the tunnel closure next April," DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg said in a statement issued last week. "From a ‘bus bridge’ over the Williamsburg Bridge to the 14th Street Busway, from more Citi Bikes to expanded pedestrian space for displaced train commuters, we and our MTA partners are up for this enormous challenge."

The SBS route was originally set to start on Jan. 6. Officials haven't offered a reason why the start date was pushed back to April 21.

Here are more details, per the MTA news release in July announcing the new SBS service:

The M14 SBS will supplement existing M14A and M14D local bus service on 14th Street, making five stops in each direction between First and Tenth Avenues ... Just before the L train tunnel reconstruction project begins, the M14 SBS route will be extended east to the planned Stuyvesant Cove ferry terminal on the East River to accommodate ferry customers from Brooklyn. Once M14 SBS is implemented, combined with the existing 14th Street local bus service and daily high-occupancy vehicle restrictions on most of 14th Street from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m., crosstown buses will be scheduled no more than two minutes apart during peak hours.

And and a few more photos from Saturday ... heading west on 14th Street (already identifying one potential SBS lane issue in front of the USPS retail storefront) ...







The L tunnel reconstruction website has more background and FAQs.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Nightmare scenario for residents who learn that 14th Street and Avenue A will be the main staging area for the L-train reconstruction

Prepping for the new protected bike lanes on 12th and 13th streets

Bike lane line work continues on 12th Street

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Town Hall provides a few more details on the 24/7 construction at 14th and A


[EVG photo from last month]

Last night, a handful of local elected officials along with reps from the MTA and the city gathered at Middle Collegiate Church on Second Avenue for an L-train shutdown Town Hall.

Aaron Gordon has a nice recap at Gothamist today. Here's an excerpt specifically related to my post yesterday about 14th Street and Avenue A serving as the main staging area for the upgrades to the Sandy-damaged Canarsie Tunnel:

Multiple residents voiced a belief that asbestos was being improperly disposed of in dumpsters near their apartments, something New York City Transit president Andy Byford assured them isn’t happening. He promised to post something on the MTA website detailing exactly what materials are being disposed of and that asbestos is not one of them, which requires completely separate disposal teams and procedures due to its high toxicity. “If you all really think that,” he said, “then I think we owe it to you to get something up on the website to get your mind at rest.”

Several citizens also expressed concern about the “considerable truck traffic,” as one put it, that has already inundated the neighborhood. Another said she’s experiencing more headaches and sore throats than usual and cannot open windows out of fear construction dust would enter her apartment. Byford pointed out they simply cannot do the work without trucks bringing materials in and out through the East Village shafts — which will become elevators into the 1st Ave L station after the shutdown is complete — but did offer that at the peak of construction, 30 trucks’ worth of debris will come out of the tunnel per day and 10 will be going in with new material.


[EVG photo from last month]

Byford also said that although the work inside the tunnel will be 24/7 to try and wrap up the project as quickly as possible, surface-level construction will not be all hours of the day.

Read the full Gothamist post here.

Meanwhile, as Streetsblog reports, Community Board 6 members said that "the current plan for next year’s L-train shutdown will fall considerable short of what will be needed to efficiently move the 400,000 daily commuters who will be affected." This link goes to the Streetsblog piece.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Report: 14th Street busway debuts in January to prep for the upcoming L-train stoppage


[Not really an M14 bus]

The city and MTA have decided to get an early start on converting 14th Street into a bus-only corridor ... beginning on Jan. 6 — three-plus months ahead of L-mageddon time.

City officials said that they need the extra months to test M14 SBS service and make adjustments before the shutdown begins.

amNY first had the story:

To ensure buses are up to the task of absorbing some of that crowd, the city and MTA plan to institute bus-only restrictions on 14th Street between 5 a.m. and 10 p.m., seven days a week. The restrictions will be in place between Ninth and Third avenues eastbound, and Third and Eighth avenues westbound. A DOT spokeswoman said the city is hashing out “specific access points” for local traffic and trucks.

The SBS route will initially make five stops between First Avenue and Tenth Avenue. The SBS route will complement existing M14A and M14D service so that buses will arrive every two minutes during morning and evening rush hours. Combined, the local and SBS service is expected to handle about 84,000 riders per day.

The shutdown of the L — between Bedford Avenue and Eighth Avenue to repair the Sandy-damaged Canarsie Tunnel — is expected to last 15 months.

Previously on EV Grieve:
Cars to give way to a bus-only corridor most hours on 14th Street during the L-train shutdown

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Cars to give way to a bus-only corridor most hours on 14th Street during the L-train shutdown



The fate of 14th Street during the L-train shutdown starting next April has apparently been decided.

As the Daily News first reported, the city will limit car traffic on 14th Street from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week.

The changes affect 14th Street from Ninth Avenue to Third Avenue eastbound and Third Avenue to Eighth Avenue westbound.

A few other details:

The city Department of Transportation ... will also change its plans for a bike lane. There will now be two one-way bike paths on 12th and 13th Sts., instead of a single two-way path on 13th St., officials said, so fewer parking spots on 13th St. will be eliminated. A DOT official said that the new design with two bike lanes would handle the higher cyclist traffic better, with easier pick up and drop-offs on the south curbs.

And...

Manhattan residents will also be able to use 14th St. for pickups and dropoffs only.

You can read more about this at Gothamist.

On Wednesday afternoon, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Transportation Committee Chair Ydanis Rodriguez will co-host a public oversight hearing to evaluate the latest mitigation plans for L-mageddon.

The shutdown of the L — between Bedford Avenue and Eighth Avenue to repair the Sandy-damaged Canarsie Tunnel — is expected to last 15 months with a start date of April 2019.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Positive vibes: Aum Shanti on the move to larger space on 14th Street



Aum Shanti, a bookshop specializing in spirituality and crystal gallery, will move to a larger space in April on 14th Street between Second Avenue and Third Avenue...



Just two storefronts away to the former Discount Cleaners... Perhaps Aum Shanti got a rent discount, as this space has been for lease for more than two years...



Aum Shanti opened as Aum Namaste, an offshoot of Namaste Bookshop, in December 2014.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Manhattanhenge — 1 good reason to visit East 14th Street tonight


Oh! We just learned this via Gothamist:

Tonight is the first of the annual four Manhattanhenge events. Starting just around 8 p.m., the sun will align precisely with the Manhattan street grid, "illuminating both the north and south sides of every cross street of the borough's grid."

So be there tonight around 8:16 for the half sun on the grid; and 8:18 tomorrow for the whole shebang of the sun.

You may also experience this on 23rd, 34th, 42nd and 57th if you really want to.

The above photo is from 2009, when Manhattanhenge was so much better!

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Report: Altercation over East 14th Street parking spot heads to trial

As you may recall from this past February, a dispute over a parking spot on East 14th Street between Avenue A and Avenue B left a woman in a coma. According to published reports, the man charged with hitting the woman now has an Oct. 24 trial date. The man, 35-year-old Oscar Fuller, has said that he was defending himself. The woman, who is in her mid 20s, was reportedly standing in the space to save the spot for her boyfriend. (CBS New York)