Friday, May 11, 2012

Here are your East Village bike share locations, probably


The city has unveiled the preliminary locations for its NYC Bike Share program sponsored by ...


Now these aren't the final final locations ... a few could still change before the program launches in July. But for now.... (and I may have missed a few nearby ...)

• North side of East 2nd Street near Avenue B
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 6th Street near Avenue B
This station will have 28 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• North side of East 7th Street near Avenue A
This station will have 35 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 10th Street near Avenue A (Tompkins Square Park)
This station will have 35 docks and will be located on the sidewalk.

• South side of East 13th Street near Avenue A
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 7th Street near First Avenue
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in a no-parking area of the street.

• South side of East 3rd Street near First Avenue
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 11th Street near Second Avenue
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 12th Street between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 2nd Street near Avenue C
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 5th Street near Avenue C
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• North side of East 9th Street near Avenue C
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• East side of Avenue D near East 11th Street (Riis Houses)
This station will have 23 docks and will be located in a NYCHA (public housing) development.

• East side of Avenue D near East 8th Street (Riis Houses)
This station will have 23 docks and will be located in a NYCHA (public housing) development.

• East side of Avenue D near East 3rd Street (Wald Houses)
This station will have 23 docks and will be located on the sidewalk.

• South side of East 3rd Street near First Avenue
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 2nd Street near Second Avenue
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 4th Street near Second Avenue
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• North side of East 7th Street near Second Avenue
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 12th Street between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• Center of East 7th Street near Cooper Square (Cooper Triangle)
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in a public park or plaza.

• West side of Fourth Avenue near East 8th Street (Astor Place)
This station will have 55 docks and will be located in a no-parking area of the street.

Find the interactive map here.

Your reaction please in the comments.

43 comments:

Anonymous said...

Love the idea of these, but it's kind of ugh when it's killing parking spaces on my street.

Big Brother said...

It will be interesting to see how this huge influx of people on bikes will effect the quality of life - the physical space these locations consume, the congestion to the bike lanes and streets, the increased number of pedestrians getting hit by bikes, the increased number of bikes getting hit by cars.

I'm neither pro or anti bike but this is going to be a huge disaster. This isn't a boardwalk on the beach, this is a major city. People need to remember that.

tiny tim said...

@ Anon 12:45...sigh...I guess it's always someone's backyard, huh?

Anonymous said...

Wow, that's a lot more than I was expecting and one's only a block away from my apt. I might actually use them.

Anonymous said...

@ Anon 12:45 pm

Way to be totally near-sighted. You are losing ONE or TWO vehicle parking spots and gaining TWENTY or more bike parking spots. I fail to see what the problem is with that.

@ Big Brother

We won't be the first major city to have a bike share. Stop being hyperbolic and try to see the value of less cars and more bikes.

MySoCalledLiver said...

I hope that with all the new bike riders, people will finally look before jaywalking in the bike lanes. Maybe they'll make the lanes bigger too, so I can safely pass the folks on these slower bikes. Can't wait.

Anonymous said...

I was grazed by a young woman on a bike today on W9th st. I was crossing with the light and she was in the bike lane. She just misjudged her stop

Anonymous said...

@mysocalledliver

Just as drivers must look out for pedestrians jaywalking in the street, so too must bikers be on the lookout for pedestrians veering into bike lanes. This is a walking city, and the only one in the country to boot. Jaywalking is what makes walking + public transportation such an efficient way of getting around NYC. I'm not anti-bike, but in a city where walking + public transportation is the predominant form of transportation, biking results in very little environmental gain (compared with, for example, a city like LA where more bike riders--> less hellishly congested freeways and smog).

esquared said...

If this fails, will the taxpayers bail-out this program?

Big Brother said...

@ Anon 1:34 PM

I'm not being the least bit hyperbolic. In the past ten years NYC's demographic has seen a dramatic increase of suburbanites who don't know how to live in a city, have no concept of person/public space, and keep their faces buried in Idevices as they walk down the streets, fearing they may actually have to interact with another person.

The thought of putting thousands of people like this on bikes and into the streets is frightening.

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

I thought this was a map of all the Subway locations!

EV Grieve said...

@ THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N.

HA!

Killing...

pennys herb co. said...

very impressed!!!!
we love bicycles

Crazy Eddie said...

The current map basically says FU to the Bronx and Staten Island. They don’t exist in Bloomberg world. As I have posted before, I am an avid cyclist but I hate, repeat hate, the First and Second Avenue bike lanes. And, I’m sorry, this concept will not work here. Unlike NYC, DC is a Southern town. Can’t wait for the inevitable collisions between the tourists who will ride this things and the Chinese electric bike delivery guys. Boom!

Anonymous said...

I stopped going to Mets games because of the Citibank connection. Do I really want to ride around advertising those pigs?
NO!

esquared said...

Oh, and for those who's arguing that this is just an alternative mean of transportation for NYers or locals, look at the map and there's nothing in Queens, only in hipster parts of Brooklyn, very few parts in Queens -- none in Astoria and The Bronx. The locations are Mostly in tourist areas.

Great idea, but please, don't jerk us around and tell us that this is for both the NYers and visitors to enjoy.

And THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N., they might as well put Subway sandwich vending machines by the docks.

Anonymous said...

this is without failt the dumbest idea these municipal morons have come up with in a long long time. there are going to be serious bike accidents as a result of this.

Anonymous said...

@BB
Of course you're being hyperbolic.
Every fucking day, someone walking across the street in this city has their life snuffed out or otherwise ruined forever by a car. You just think you are "owed" something, and you want to use cyclists as your scapegoat for not receiving it. Take responsibility, and stay the fuck out of my bike lane.

Anonymous said...

I'm all for adding some bikes in the city like this, but it seems overkill to have this many. Do the other cities that do this have one every two blocks?

Anonymous said...

Ridiculous. Hopeful;y a new mayor and Transportation Commissioner will rip the whole thing out and pave over all the bike lanes, which half the bike riders don't even use, while a bunch of whom do, but think nothing of going the wrong way on them.

Anonymous said...

I'm curious what will happen to the 'salmon' (wrong way riders) when this rolls out. I'm hpoing that the increase in bike riders going the right direction will make it impossible for people to salmon

Big Brother said...

I'm not owed anything and I don't dare step foot in the bike line. I value my life. Dick.

Anonymous said...

@esquared.
If you look at this link you will see the plan is to expand the coverage next year. Doesnt address all your concerns but you can see what we get this Summer is not the end of the plan
http://www.streetsblog.org/2012/05/11/the-bike-share-map-its-real-its-big-and-its-only-going-to-get-bigger/

MySoCalledLiver said...

@Anon 2:17 PM

I'm not against jaywalkers, it's just that they tend to look for cars in the street and not bikes in the bike lanes. Perhaps the bike share will produce, dare I say, a 'critical mass' in the lanes that will train jaywalkers to look first. I can't always stop or ditch my bike in time before getting hit (by jayrunners in my case). I stay out of the lanes now if I want to maintain cruising speed, going the right way and catching the green lights.

Anonymous said...

Simple as this: people are going to get fuuuucked up.

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

Going by the information in this post, East 2nd Street and East 7th Street are drowning in bikes:

• South side of East 2nd Street near Second Avenue
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• North side of East 2nd Street near Avenue B
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 2nd Street near Avenue C
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

101 bikes in a 4 block stretch of 2nd Street

• Center of East 7th Street near Cooper Square (Cooper Triangle)
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in a public park or plaza

• North side of East 7th Street near Second Avenue
This station will have 39 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

• South side of East 7th Street near First Avenue
This station will have 31 docks and will be located in a no-parking area of the street.

• North side of East 7th Street near Avenue A
This station will have 35 docks and will be located in the parking lane of the street.

144 bikes in a 4 block stretch of 7th Street

Did Citibank do any type of neighborhood outreach to see if the people who live on these streets want to have these curb-side businesses feet from their windows, never mind the sacrificing of the already limited parking spots?

Anonymous said...

"it's kind of ugh when it's killing parking spaces on my street."

You're a New Yorker. Lose the goddamned car.

I seriously think the only cars that should be permitted in this town are cabs and licensed trucks. I think the new bike lanes are awesome, and I really like this bikeshare program.

And I don't even bike (yet). I just think cars kill a place. Everyone likes their own car, but once you start thinking you should go everywhere in your car, the life gets snuffed out of the streets.

Anonymous said...

Isn't there a way to do this without taking so many parking spaces- They can make smaller kiosks that do not take up so much space- there is a clear anti-car message in all this- taking dozens of parking spaces and car lanes for exclusive bike lanes, now these several dozen kiosks in each area. This creates a false dichotomy that we must do one or the other but we can do both- we can accommodate cars and bikes if we respect each other.

Anonymous said...

there are going to be serious bike accidents as a result of this.

Well, obviously. If there are people riding bikes, there will be bike accidents. That isn't a reason not to have bikes. There are also serious car accidents, you may have heard, yet it doesn't seem you are in favor of banning cars.


I'm not against jaywalkers, it's just that they tend to look for cars in the street and not bikes in the bike lanes. Perhaps the bike share will produce, dare I say, a 'critical mass' in the lanes that will train jaywalkers to look first.

Of course it will. Once upon a time, people were used to horses and buggies in the streets, not cars. And the people driving cars drove like lunatics. And there were tons of accidents. And all you people would have been writing about how insane it is to allow motorized vehicles on the city streets. Eventually the car-city-pedestrian relationship reached the level of relative civility we are familiar with. So will it happen with bikes.

Anonymous said...

ARGHHHHH!

East Village/Lower East Side, 42nd street, Meat Packing District, The Bowery, Williamsburg.... the list continues. It's O V E R :(

Anonymous said...

@ Anon 9:48 PM

Unlike the speculative scenario you describe, thousands of cars were not introduced to the city at the time. There was a transition. Not the case here.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 8 PM - once upon a time there were lots of cars in the streets, but also lots of pedestrians. Those pedestrians kept their eyes straight ahead so they could see their fellow citizens, maybe smile at them or say hello, look in store windows, interact with the great city around them. Now you have lots of cars and lots of pedestrians, but they seal themselves off from the world around them with their little pieces of crap technology, heads down while they text or tweet or whatever, refusing to make eye contact, hermetically walled away so they can connect with everything but what is directly in front of or to the side of them. Cars did not snuff out life on the streets, the friggin' Ipod and Smartphones did.

Big Brother said...

Speaking of hyperbolic, I love the foaming-at-the-mouth outrage some of the pro-bike people have against the legitimate questions/concerns of the other commenters on this post.

Anonymous said...

@Big Brother

It sounds like the same person over and over.

Anonymous said...

I like this as a concept, but the question I have is this: will there be any demand for this in January? If it snows, will someone shovel these things out? Because honestly, if they can't be used year-round, then it'll be a problem.

Anonymous said...

I can't believe all this hate for bikes. Where does it come from, do this many people really not know the fun and efficiency of riding a bike. David Byrne knows, Freddie Mercury knew, are they not supercool people? Nobody likes to be assailed by a punkass cyclist, I get that, but be honest, they are the minority, it is childish to use these examples to support an anti-bicycle stance. And a lot of people use the bike lanes, quit trying to say that nobody uses them. Just take a look during morning and evening rush hours, you will see a lot of normal working people getting to and from work on normal, non-fixed gear bikes, a lot of them wearing helmets, sporting headlights and warning bells and riding at a modest non-asshole speeds. Most of the riders who are "salmoning" are delivery guys.

Big Brother said...

"I can't believe all this hate for bikes. Where does it come from..."

If you take the time to read the comments you'll find your answer, though I know the most important thing here is for you to hear the sound of your own voice.

And please, will you - and everyone else under the age of 25 - learn the meaning of the word hate. Hate is hanging someone from a tree because of their race. Hate is beating someone unconscious because they are gay. Hate is not a variety of people debating whether this bike initiative is a good or bad thing for the city.

Grow up.

Anonymous said...

Hi Anonymous 2:17 a.m. If the system in NYC works like it does in Montreal, the bikes will be gone well before January. They just put them out here about two weeks ago or so for spring, and they will be out until about mid fall.

Anonymous said...

Very ambitious. Will there be enough demand right off to justify installing so many stations? I'm all for it, and hope it succeeds. Although the bicycles are really and truly ugly.

Glad that this will be taking away parking space rather than the critically limited sidewalk space. Sidewalks should still be widened in many places to accommodate and encourage pedestrian traffic.

Next step should be a new plan for congestion pricing to reduce automobile traffic in the city.

- East Villager

Rockergirl said...

Gone before January? I have faith in my fellow NYers: the bikes will be gone (and repainted and sold) in 2 days after they're put out there.

And to the person who wants to ban all cars but cabs: Well, what about when my brother has to drive in from the Island to pick me up from the hospital, or drop off books or furniture? Can't do THAT on a bike or in a cab. Jackass.

Anonymous said...

blue.

glamma said...

WHAT
THE
F*CK

NOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

goodbye parking...
holy cr@p what a disaster!

screw YOU, citibank...

where's the petition???

glamma said...

people, PLEASE, wake up.. this is bloomberg selling us out to big banks and tourists, ONCE again. WHAT RESIDENTS WANTS 144 BIKES on their street not to mention all the YAHOOS that will come for them.. the money generated from this will NEVER benefit residents... this is part of the attack on New Yorkers... my apt alone will be absolutely drowning in this crap... i am sick about this. even ONE THIRD of these locations would be overkill!
THIS IS MADNESS
keep acquiesing to this stuff... and see what kind of city we'll be in... this has NOTING to do with pro bike vs pro car - which is a shame..... it is enblematic off pretty much every other problem that new yorkers are facing though... just disgusting