Tuesday, July 6, 2021

Storm damage: reports of trees and limbs down; Ace Bar's curbside structure collapses

The high winds from this evening's thunderstorm KO'd a tree outside 323 E. 10th St. between Avenue A and Avenue B... coming to rest on a car in the process, as these photos from a longtime reader show...
Hard to tell from the pics, but it appears the car may have been spared serious damage... and no injuries. 

Meanwhile on Avenue B at Seventh Street (thanks @theenemieslist1!) ...
From 11th Street and Second Avenue (not 12th as ID'd on the tweet)... And on Fifth Street between Avenue A and Avenue B, the curbside structure outside Ace Bar flipped over... (thank you @tjack411) ... also no injuries reported here...
The FDNY helped stack up the remains of the structure...

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think Paul Gale’s video is actually on 11th and 2nd ave.

Choresh Wald said...

It is illegal to park on 10th street between Avenue A and Avenue B before 8pm I think

noble neolani said...

So the city wants to make these structures permanent? Not only do they attract rats, they will burn like kindle if you light a match, occupy parking spots, bring more noise to the streets year-round, and sometimes resemble a shanty town.

Anonymous said...

Many people want to keep the outdoor dining permanent as well because it improves the ambience of the city, creates a bigger public use, and creates more opportunity for small businesses in this city. Just because you personally have issues with some aspects doesn't mean that is a universal view.

LPIFLY said...

So long ACE shack.

Anonymous said...

6pm on 10th at that location - after that it's glorious car parking for the whole night and you don't even have to pay for it.

Choresh Wald said...

Free car parking spots are free car storage spots.

Anonymous said...

The fallen Locust tree in front of my building across from Tompkins Square Park on East 10th St. (between Avenue A & B)was toppled by a sudden monster gust of wind (60 mph?)Tuesday evening. First, the tree fell on top of a white box van driving by, just missing the driver and crushing a big dent in the top of the van body behind him. Then, the tree bounced off the van and landed on top of a white Mercedes sedan temporarily parked there, shattering its rear window and damaging the body (damage would have been worse if the van hadn't absorbed the initial shock). Thankfully, the van driver, who works in the E.V. at the Mitchell-Lama Houses, was shaken but not hurt and stayed on the scene. The parked Mercedes was borrowed from the mother of a woman living on E. 10th St. who had the bad luck of parking for a few minutes there to move some stuff. She was in her apartment when the tree fell. She said that if she had left her apartment a minute sooner, she probably would have been hit standing on the sidewalk next to the car. Finally, a very big THANK YOU to LADDER COMPANY 9 who came fairly quickly and used a chain saw and some muscle to cut up remove the 15 inch diameter tree that was on top of the car, the sidewalk and blocking E. 10th St. and off of the car. By the way, the base of the tree was hollow and rotten with live termites (which some birds swooped down to eat before the FDNY came). The termites entered the tree because cars/trucks backed into it two separate times taking large chunks out of the bark and trunk. We need the city to install metal barriers around our precious trees to protect them and fight climate change.

LPIFLY said...

Looks like I picked a good night to ride my 4th of July vacation out a day longer. Maybe I can actually find a parking spot when I get back

Unknown said...

@3:34- Termites don't eat living trees. The base of the tree was most likely diseased and when the rot set in the termites came from underground colonies and then began to munch away until the base became unstable and toppled over in the wind storm. Termites hate sunlight and fresh air. Highly unlikely they would invade a tree above ground through an area where a piece of bark was missing.

Anonymous said...

^ This is truth. If you've been around here long enough, you know this is what, sadly, happens to many of our larger city trees.