Friday, September 9, 2016

La Newyorkina softly opening on Astor Place place today; first of 2 new food vendors


Via the EVG inbox... details on two new food-drink choices for the revamped Astor Place — La Newyorkina, on the Astor Place North Plaza and Astor Plate, on the Astor Place South Plaza.

From the news release:

La Newyorkina
Founded in 2010, La Newyorkina features an array of sweets and treats from Chef Fany Gerson’s native Mexico. The La Newyorkina story started with paletas (hand-made, seasonal ice pops) using traditional Mexican flavors like tamarind, chocolate and dried chiles. The paletas were sold out of carts at local food festivals and built a loyal following at Smorgasburg, Jacob Riis Park and the High Line.

La Newyorkina’s Astor Place kiosk will showcase a broader menu, including a variety of Mexican confections and pastries (paletas, ice cream and chamoyadas) as well as Dough doughnuts for breakfast. The kiosk design reflects modern Mexico and features a hand-painted mural reflecting the local neighborhood.

Astor Plate
Perry Mallas has a knack for bringing together quality food and a sense of place. His latest project, Astor Plate, will serve the Village community by offering healthy comfort food, coffee and beverages, organic and locally sourced wherever possible. For this project, Perry is collaborating with the same creative team at Patrick Nash Design that designed and built Flatiron Green and Benvenuto Café.

Complementing the food and beverage menu, Astor Plate is also collaborating with MUD Coffee to bring back a local icon to Astor Place. Although the MudTruck is on an indefinite hiatus, MUD is delighted to once again be part of this vibrant public space later this fall.

Still no word when the Alamo will return.

La Newyorkina will be open today from noon to 4 p.m.

17 comments:

cmarrtyy said...

The picture of the Astor rebuild becomes so transparent...it's an out door restaurant... And to confirm it, I heard they are adding cup holders to the Alamo. Some Board members actually wanted to put a pickup window in it but thankfully that was voted down in favor of the cupholders.

Giovanni said...

That's why they put in the giant power supply box on the east side of the plaza. Now we can have 24 hour lighting for pop up stores, special events and holiday markets just like Bryant Park. How long will it be before we get the holiday ice skating rink with the Alamo in the center?

Anonymous said...

Tourist plaza. Expect more hotel construction in the immediate vicinity, and more destruction of historic architecture.

Anonymous said...

Midtown South to the left of me /
Tompkins Square Pigsty to my right /
Here I am ...

Anonymous said...

Walked by there this afternoon...with so much barren concrete covered space, what a great idea to put a food kiosk right next to the subway entrance where any morning line impeded access to the subway?? I really would like to know who thought this up..

Anonymous said...

I need a new city. I can't live in the suburbs and that's what we are now thanks to developers and airBNB. Has anyone else noticed all the huge new Suburban SUVs and their type lining the streets all the sudden, many with Texas/Florida/Massachusetts/Wisconsin etc. license plates? We never had these before, most everyone knew to choose lower cars for city driving. But now that the suburbs have arrived, we get their suburban bullshit. Like huge SUVS and malls and tourist plazas and food courts and basic people. I have loved this neighborhood for decades. In just 2-4 years, I have now grown to loathe it. It is for consumers only. More for tourists than residents. Die Yuppie Scum, indeed.

JQ LLC said...

La Newyorkia? how La me'

These artisanal dining experiences are being forced on the citizenry by the goddamn banks and the real estate industry. There is nothing natural or even innovative about these businesses. The gentrification industrial complex of banks, real estate, venture capitalism and government are almost dictating what culture and living in this city should be. Sometimes I get the inkling that these are 24 hour movie sets. Even the shuttered gate stores.

This moron bullshit zeitgeist is happening in our public parks and beaches too. It's a revolting development. Frivolous spenders get the spoils. Taxpaying ordinary people get indifference and neglect.

I have seen the Texas plates too. And a lot of California plates if you want to gripe some more.

Although developers and Airbnb are the villains we know, the biggest fiends are the ones that were voted in and in the 21st century, won with low voter turnout. Senile Guliani, "Fun Size" mayor bloomberg and our current Mayor De Faustio, who, without even trying may be the most corrupt bag of dead dicks to run the city since Tweed, and has gave (he foolishly assumes) legitimacy to honest graft. It is almost easy to overlook our alleged unsweared as governor Mario's Son's scaly hands on rental cap legislation and brown nose up REBNY's collective taint

http://gawker.com/heres-a-crazy-theory-we-heard-about-andrew-cuomo-1785207851

(I know it's gawker, but it does seem plausible considering what a corrupt worm andrew is)

Anonymous said...

I need a new city too. This is not the same NYC I moved to in 2000. This neighborhood especially feels and looks parochial and suburban. Astor Place is becoming a mini-Times Square in ways. If NYC continues to move in this direction, I will either move to Copenhagen, Stockholm, or Berlin.

FYI. There was also an article today in the NY Post which compared NY today to Toronto. WTF happened to NYC?

Anonymous said...

I can't wait to read the denunciations of next week's Astor Place Festival. Some people who post here must learn to accept that the East Village was not created in the image they have of it--an image derived from their memories of how exciting it was when they were young. A city is a vibrate, changing, growing organism. It is always absorbing new people, new ideas, and a changing environment. I may not always like what I see, but it doesn't exist exclusively for me. So yes, I like the changes that are happening to Astor Place.

Gojira said...

Yes, Anon. 12:31, because vast gray slabs of treeless concrete are SO vibrant.

Anonymous said...

That people are actually moving into the city rather than fleeing from it should be seen as positive. But not to the Debbie downers in this forum. Sheesh.

cmarrtyy said...

People moving in? But what kind of people... New tenants on their balcony below my apartment screaming out over the traffic..."Hello, fucking New York" Then they got into talking about "Jew girls". Low life and concrete plazas go together... SHEEEEEESH.

Anonymous said...

Okay critics--what was Astor Place before this renovation? A small island with the Alamo. Not a bench or tree in sight. It was a brutal public space. East 9th Street and Fourth Avenue was a dangerous intersection--when the north flowing traffic on the east side of Fourth avenue wanted to make the wide turn onto 9th Street there were often accidents. Pedestrians didn't have time to make the crossing in time, because of turning traffic. Yes, Astor Place was a wonderful and inviting public space, a neighborhood space, a space to be proud of!! (Yes I am being sarcastic!) Yes one can lament the open space of what became Cooper Union's Starbucks. But the yellow building was woefully inadequate for the needs of the academic programs.

Gojira said...

I am so lucky - some of those people who moved to New York that Anon. 12:31 loves so much have been commemorating the 15th anniversary of the destruction of the WTC and the deaths of thousands by having a booze bash in their backyard across from my bedroom, where they have spent hours literally shrieking and howling like they're being ripped apart by banshees. I suppose, in an earlier time and place, that might have been considered mourning, but in today's New York, those of us who have at least half a brain know much, much better. Many thanks, Icon, for consistently renting to such low-life pieces of trash.

Anonymous said...

That there are more douchebags today than in 1950-1970 sucks. But it's the same anywhere and at least New York has a depth of memory, represented by folks like you, to temper the trend. There are ways to change things and it's not by becoming crotchety old cliches. Support the businesses you like proactively. Go stand by people and organizations who are actually doing substantive culturally enriching things in the neighborhood. And do so for the good, new stuff, too. Not just your own projects that you've been used to. It's time to breathe new cultural life back into the Village, rather than just bitching and moaning about the as Sholes, who we all despise.

Anonymous said...

Well said!đŸ˜«

Anonymous said...

How was this food kiosk approved on a public sidewalk? It's hot pink and directly blocking the view of a historic and iconic NYC subway entrance. I can't believe that this went through all of the proper channels of approval...