Wednesday, June 6, 2018

1st glass: 80 E. 10th St. shows off its floor-to-ceiling windows



Here's a look at the 10-floor condoplex shaping up over on 10th Street and Fourth Avenue... as previously noted, there will be 12 units here in the development called Eighty East Tenth, ranging from one to five bedrooms...



Prices range from $1.95 million to "wow, seriously?" (Of the 10 units listed at the Eighty East Tenth website, eight are in contract, with a fall move-in date.)

Here's a look at the final product, via designer NAVA... the rendering is not too accurate, given that there isn't a line outside Tim Ho Wan across the street...



14 comments:

Donnie Moder said...

This is the equivalent of architectural gentrification. The village is so not "the village" anymore. Meet you at the Pret.

Anonymous said...

I live very near to this new building, and I am looking forward to seeing it when the sheathing is taken away and to see what high end retail stores will be on the street level (I can guarantee they won't be mom and pop shops selling nick knacks). If you look at the streets from 9th through 11th Streets between 3rd and 4th avenues, there is nothing architecturally interesting that is worth the struggle to save--except for the struggle to prevent any change whatsoever. As for "The village is not the village anymore," an easy cliche to keep spouting. When did it cease to be "the village" that is enshrined in your memory (when the Orchida closed?). A city is a vibrant changing organism. Things need to be protected, but I doubt that the shops that were on this corner qualify for that designation. You don't like the building? That's your opinion.

Anonymous said...

I agree with Donnie totally - terrible what is happening.
The old buildings have character and have lasted well for
over 100 years.
These new buildings - what will they look like in 25 years ?
Look at the new-ish building on 3rd Ave 13 -14 St, looks worn already.

There is really nothing to like with the new buildings - that building
does not ooze vibrant.


cmarrtyy said...

9:21

" If you look at the streets from 9th through 11th Streets between 3rd and 4th avenues, there is nothing architecturally interesting that is worth the struggle to save--except for the struggle to prevent any change whatsoever. "

What is worth saving is the human scale of those buildings and for that matter the human scale of life in the EV.

If you knew anything about design and city planning you wouldn't have made such a stupid, arrogant statement.

In your way of thinking a NYCHA complex is preferable to a low rise neighborhood. GOOD LUCK WITH THAT!

Anonymous said...

12 units - that means 12 idiotically entitled people with more money than sense will be buying there.

And they'll be so close to the new Moxy hotel when it opens, wow, how fun! They'll really get their money's worth!

Anonymous said...

I agree with 9:21 and since when did name calling become acceptable? Or is it reserved for the few, the proud, the constant commentators here?

Anonymous said...

Wow. I cannot believe how this building has come together so quickly. I am stunned.

Anonymous said...

So let's see what this building set to open in the fall replaced: a one story store that once was a convenience store with the open food offerings; next to it on 10th street was a single store space (once a record store if I remember), and then a small building that had been abandoned for many years. So Anon 12:26 the people who will buy these expensive apartments on 10th Street are somehow aligned to the Moxy Hotel on 11th Street? And cmarrtyy, I've found that those who argue strongly for the "low rise" as the essential character of the EV are generally those who are ensconced in their rent stabilized apartments and don't see the need to increase the stock of apartments to accommodate an increasing city population. I spent my working career as a teacher, so I always think of "middle class" as being defined by what a teacher makes and can afford for rent. So yes, I'd like to see some politician stand up for high rise buildings where the rents are set at rates a middle class family can afford.

Anonymous said...

Sounds like whoever is for the overpriced 'vibrant' building is probably, possibly
someone from that development and does not understand
the neighborhood, just sees it in real estate development views.

Sounds like we should be grateful the building is here to improve our lot in life.

Gee, Thanks !

JQ LLC said...

@10:03 and @2:54

This article explains how it will turn out and how fast it went up.

https://therealdeal.com/issues_articles/fighting-back-when-a-new-condo-roof-leaks/

Buyers beware and citizens duck and cover.

https://impunitycity.wordpress.com/

cmarrtyy said...

3:40

It's interesting that from California to New York, high rise government housing projects have been demolished and replaced by townhouses. Hmmm. Wonder why. I wonder why??????

Anonymous said...

What a fabulous building, if you like a big fat COLUMN in every habitable room, AND you're paying north of $4 million for the privilege!

I must be living in a slum; none of the rooms in my apartment has a column to get in my way.

Unknown said...

1.2 million and up to buy....$3,800 to $4,000 a month for a rental apartment? It is incredible and sad as most of my friends have been priced right out of the neighborhood...now the neighborhood is taken over by Millennial's who work long hours and then want to use the LES as party central on the weekends....with no end to the bars that are eager for their money. If it wasn't for the rent stabilized apartments and housing projects you probably would not have anyone making less than $100,000 a year who could even afford to live in the LES anymore.

Anonymous said...

@3:40pm: You say: "I've found that those who argue strongly for the "low rise" as the essential character of the EV are generally those who are ensconced in their rent stabilized apartments and don't see the need to increase the stock of apartments to accommodate an increasing city population."

Well, I'm *not* ensconced in a rent stabilized apartment; rather, I bought an apartment in this neighborhood 40 years ago and sank deep roots into this place; at the time I bought, you couldn't give the neighborhood away, and most of my friends wouldn't go south of 14th St. b/c it was considered too dangerous. I've been paying NYC real estate and water & sewer taxes, etc. for my entire adult life, thanks.

Yet I *still* feel that this building will be occupied by yes, IMO, idiotically entitled people. Just look at the prices and let me know if you (or anyone you know) can afford this place. And tell me if you think the buyers here are people who'll be very interested in the character of the area? They, IMO, are the philistines moving into a neighborhood-inappropriate building, helping to wreck the area many of us have known, loved & enjoyed for many decades.

This building is NOT increasing the "stock of apartments to accommodate an increasing city population" other than for the handful of people who can afford multi-million dollar apartments there.

What's going on is that low-rise buildings which allowed us ALL to see the sky have now been replaced by a hubristic oddly-shaped glass box for those with many millions to spend on one apartment ... if you can't tell why this building will not be an asset to the neighborhood, I can't help you.