Friday, November 28, 2014

Looking at a Cube-less Astor Place



On Tuesday, workers carted off the Alamo from Astor Place… for safekeeping during the reconstruction phase.





No word how long the cube will be in storage. But it will return as the centerpiece for the all-new Astor Plaza…



The cube was installed here in 1967.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Personally I think it is BS that they "boxed" it in in the first place They just wanted to pad their week with hours.. They knew they were going to have to move it all along.

Anonymous said...

The lack of imagination with this space is astounding. I hope the cube comes back otherwise it's just a field of cement.

Anonymous said...

This re-design is a complete waste of time and money.

The re-design is so NOT necessary - but it sure does line the pockets of engineers, designers & construction companies! Hmm, I wonder who's behind that, and how it got approved?!

Sadly, this is OUR tax $$ at work - or more to the point, being wasted.

Anonymous said...

Couldn't they have put in some type of garden or trees or even benches in the middle of that cement field? Good job Amanda Burden!

Anonymous said...

5:10 is right. This has to be a favor to put $$$ in somebody's pocket. It's just too stupid.

golden prana said...

There is a miniture in east Hampton at guild hall.

E said...

I believe the reason for the large concrete "field" is because of the historical path that runs through the area. If you notice that the new 51 Astor Place also leaves a diagonal cut across its southeast portion for a public plaza. The original building, home to the Cooper Union's engineering building, also left a public plaza there as well (in front of the former Starbucks).

This is because Stuyvesant St runs has traditionally run through that area from its days as a Native American trail, and the design had to leave that as open space. The path probably continues towards 4th Ave, hence the open space. This doesn't mean I agree with the design though. More trees or gardening would've been nice.

http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20110712/lower-east-side-east-village/board-blasts-astor-place-plaza-design-as-too-park-avenue

Anonymous said...

Most streets carry water pipes, telephone and electrical wires (note all the pipes). There really is no way to plant trees above that unless you use concrete planters, which are usually just as unattractive.