Thursday, January 5, 2017

Lanza's is done as contents being auctioned off today



Lanza's closed back in July ... as the state's fluorescent SEIZED sticker (for "nonpayment of taxes") arrived at the restaurant on First Avenue between 10th Street and 11th Street.

Since then, the old-world Italian restaurant, which first opened in 1904, sat languishing...

Unfortunately, the restaurant will not be reopening (a sign in the window said "closed until further notice"). The contents of Lanza's are being auctioned off the afternoon at 3. EVG correspondent Steven took a look inside...







28 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hate to see any business that old have to close but this particular place seemed like a relic, no longer really relevant in the world of dining-out in the aught teens.

Goggla said...

Ugh, this is so sad.

John M said...

That's a shame. Guess the most recent owners couldn't make it work.

catt55 said...

Now that underworld deals can be made "remotely" who needs those exhorbitant lasagne calories, ya know??? #riptonysoprano

Anonymous said...

Great food..sad to see them go.

Anonymous said...

sorry to hear this ,i have many memories as this was my Grandfather store on my mothers side and my grandfather on my fathers side opened DeRobertis Pastry shop down the block which closed in Dec. 2014, but since has reopened in Clifton New Jersey under the name DeRoLicious Delights in November 2015 .Thanks for the memories. John DeRobertis

Anonymous said...

Food here was mehh and the service was all over the charts. Our waiter left the premises and didn't return for 40 min?? Not to mention they were in desperate need of a freshening up of the interior. i.e., paint crumbling, bathrooms falling apart, smelled of animal urine, even the iPad in which we paid had a cracked screen. Maybe someone comes in with a fresh approach to old school Italian American cuisean.

Giovanni said...

This is more terrible news (thanks Grieve) but as crazy as the restaurant business is today, what did we expect? The space is too big for rolled ice cream or Dollar Pizza or marshmallows. Maybe Black Seed Bagels needs a place to expand?

Unknown said...

For years back in the 90s this wasn't even a restaurant. Weeks would go by and you would never see any customers. I remember my friend going in and trying to order dinner only to be told they were out of basically evey dish on the menu. Finally he just demanded spaghetti and marinara. The angry waiter stalked out and returned a few minutes later with a jar of Ragu and cheap pasta.

Anonymous said...

I went here a few times in the early 90s, and the food wasn't great, so I never went back. It's too bad because I love old-school Italian food. Did it get better over the years?

Anonymous said...

A shame that the charming interior will disappear.

Unknown said...

"Aught teens" is not a word. "Aught" is a term that refers to the zero in the tens place, between the hundreds and the ones. The proper term is "twenty teens."

Anonymous said...

Sad to see the passing of a neighborhood institution. As we've talked about on EVG before, Lanza's was WELL past it's prime when it was sold to the owners of Sal Anthony's, probably back in the '90's. I had only eaten there a couple of times since they bought it, and back then, the food was still good. A lot can go wrong in 20+ years. Bye bye Lanzas, you had great mussels marinara !

blue glass said...

WTF?
Anonymous 11:40 AM said
...this particular place seemed like a relic, no longer really relevant in the world of dining-out in the aught teens.

what is relevant in the world of dining out in any year? expensive, sterile, stainless and glass? ear splitting music? a $14 glass of wine? foamed sauce? faux food? the most expensive? gold dust on an omelette?

while the food was inconsistant and some of the wait staff were not so attentive, the palce had a history older than any of the current neighborhood residents.

most of the new restaurant are narrow crowded spaces with limited menus becaues the rents are too high to maintain a larger space.
is that the the world of dining-out in the aught teens?

Geraldine polt said...

Hi John long time it's a bit of a fond memory loved both place and MHC is gone now too geraldine polt

Anonymous said...

Blue glass, by irrelevant all I meant was that I never saw anyone in there. Not judging their food, just their place in the current dining out scene. Relevant to me means anything that's thriving.

Andy said...

Folks still got John's on 12th. Support it if you value it. Hope whoever takes over this space is mindful enough to keep what's left of the old decor if not the cuisine too.

Anonymous said...

Never sold to Sal Anthony's it was leased - The Lanza Family still owns the property

Mike said...

Lanza's was an institution, and we're not talking restaurant reviews. In the late 60's, walking up 1st Ave. at 10th, I see a black Cadillac with Jersey plates double park up ahead. Out of either side come two large gentlemen in suits, and they walk to the rear passenger door. Their charge emerges, and they escort Frankie Valli into the restaurant.

Anonymous said...

Never sold to Sal Anthony's it was leased and The Lanza Family still owns the property.

Anonymous said...

@ 9:58, is there a reason someone should be mindful of the old décor? When you rent an apartment do you want the prior tenant's old rug and mattress or wall posters...

Hey19 said...

I liked Lanzas, If I recall, I watched a Leeds promotion game there a while ago, good memories with some old friends.

Anonymous said...

A true loss. Someone should go get that beautiful painting hanging on the right in the back..a painting of a ladies and lanterns....if it is a real painting by the artist then it is worth a lot of money. Years ago I looked and thought it was worth about $15K. But I couldnt tell if it were a real painting or a reproduction..but it is worth looking at hard if you can figure it out.

Anonymous said...

@11:47, Are you originally from Nebraska or Iowa ? or is there another reason you don't understand the reasons for preserving 100 year old architectural details ? New York City won't be defined by plastic McDonalds interiors.

Anonymous said...

I like old school just about anything but this place never enticed me come in for a meal which may have been it's biggest problem, I'm near 60 and I thought of it as a place my elderly parents would dine at. At least it has closed without the horrid landlord want to triple the rent scenario.

Anonymous said...

I went here for years usually lunch mid week there was an entourage of retired female teachers well into their eighties who would come in for lunch and conversation among themselves. The place was never crowded the occasional family event could bring a group of twenty. The service would vary from attentive to where are you and my check? In time a lot of the elderly that were a mainstay stopped coming the place thinned out. The decorum once charming old world looked seedy and worn. The food continued to decline last time I ate there about two years ago the pasta was clearly reheated and the prosciutto taste like cardboard. A establishment has to make itself relevant it can not rely on nostalgia to keep it going.

Unknown said...

Yes, under Eddie's management, the food and service improved dramatically! Their eggplant parmigiana was the best as was their artichoke dish.

Linda Messina said...

Sometime in November of 2011 I gave myself a retirement party. I invited about 40 people, mostly friends but some family. All expenses paid. Eddie made all the negotiations and arrangeme with me. It went off without a problem! A good time was had by all! Food and deserts was very good. Beer and wine at tables as much as guests wanted! Sorry to set it close!