Tuesday, March 19, 2013

The Post features Jennifer Esposito's East Village bakery today

The Post today has a feature on actress Jennifer Esposito's new "roll" (haha, Post) ... her gluten-free, dairy-free, refined-sugar-free, soy-free, peanut-free, allergy-friendly, organic bakery that opened on East 10th Street on March 2.

The piece touches on her 14-hour work days at Jennifer's Way Bakery and her battle with celiac disease... which led her to open the bakery...

And it's serious business here... to the article!

Rick Byrd, 56, a friend of the actress, who was recently manning the cash register, tells of how Esposito’s boyfriend, model Louis Dowler, recently came in with a sandwich from another shop and was made to leave, lest his lunch contaminate the space.

“We don’t even allow gluten on the premise,” says Byrd, who is severely gluten-intolerant himself. “It’s a safe zone.”

Previously on EV Grieve:
Actress Jennifer Esposito's Jennifer's Way Bakery opening soon on East 10th Street

18 comments:

IMNURAUMAN NYR said...

That's funny. Bringing a sandwich into her "gluten-free, dairy-free, refined-sugar-free, soy-free, peanut-free, allergy-friendly, organic bakery free place" is something that Samantha would do in Samanatha Who? Loved her as Andrea Belladonna, Christina Applegate's bitchy best friend. Welcome to the neighborhood.

Anonymous said...

So what exactly is left as possible ingredients for the baked items?

- East Villager

Anonymous said...

P.S. Welcome to the neighborhood, indeed. The more bakeries, the better

- East Villager (with serious sweet tooth)

Uncle Waltie said...

I'm a glutton for gluten.

Anonymous said...

While her business acumen in targeting a growing niche is to be commended, why are all these neurasthenic hypocondriacs moving here in the first place? Shouldn't they just find a plastic bubble somewhere to live where there is no pizza, knishes, dumplings, kolaches, patties, heros, etc.?

Anonymous said...

Love how "neurasthenic hypocondriacs," aka people who live with unfortunate food allergies, like myself, suddenly have to live in certain neighborhoods. So where should we be cordoned off, since obviously the East Village is not for people like us? Thx @Anon 2:24! You're an ass.

BagelGuy said...

These guys are not cool . . You don't go around knocking your neighbors shops ( blogs and bad Yelp reviews ) in order to boost up your own shop. Not cool. Not neighborly. Most of the small businesses in the EV have each others backs and help each other in times of need. If you really have issue with a shop owner or how he conducts his biz, take it to said owner personally and discuss the issue face to face. That is, if you REALLY are interested in helping fix a problem and not just promoting your own agenda.

VH McKenzie said...

"on the premise?"

Anonymous said...

I heard that this bakery is a front for her to do a reality t.v. show. Anyone else heard the same?

Anonymous said...

I had a gluten free cupcake the other day (not from here) and it tasted like sandpaper. The puzzling thing for me is that if you're averse to gluten, why are you eating pastas and cakes in the first place, gluten free or not. Stick to ice cream.

Ken from Ken's Kitchen said...

Anon March 19, 2013 at 2:24 PM

Celiac has a genetic marker, but you're not necessarily born with sensitivity to wheat gluten. Both my wife and I have lived here more than 30 years. She only developed a sensitivity to wheat gluten a few years ago after erninsurgery to correct GERD.

Her sensitivity causes a problem that's pretty terrifying to witness -- she passed out on the sidewalk entering hypoglycemic coma. Fortunately we were right around the corner from St Vincent's the first time it happened.

So piss off.

Anonymous said...

The rapid rise of no gluten shops is interesting if only because of the small number of gluten intolerant people relative to the population.

olympiasepiriot said...

to Anonymous @ March 20, 2013 at 2:40 PM:

I'm not gluten intolerant, but I do buy the gluten-free stuff occasionally 'cause when I give a party, I really like to make/have plenty of food and my friends and acquaintences are a pretty varied bunch, both intellectually and gastronomically. I always make sure to have vegan options, omnivoure options, alcohol-free, alcohol-laden (I love punch recipes) etc. etc. So, getting some gluten-free goodies just is part of the package. I enjoy hosting people and don't want them to *have* to bring their own food. (Though I certainly don't turn away anything that people bring from home -- everyone has some specialty they like to share.) The gluten-free bakeries have increased the options for that. But, you're right, there sure are a LOT of them now. I think they are all in this neighborhood...not nearly as many uptown.

Anonymous said...

I love the gluten-free shops because many are also sensitive other allergies. I'm allergic to dairy and I'm vegan, so these shops are a blessing!

glamma said...

i trust bagel guy to the utmost.
that's not f*cking cool jen!
take your hollywood cr@p outta here if you cant manage to be a good neighbor in THE BEST NEIGHBORHOOD IN THE WORLD

Anonymous said...

Sorry but they lost me when another person's sandwich would "contaminate" their "safe space". That is just silly and hypochondriacal- is his sandwich going to jump into your mouth?

Anonymous said...

Those of you who are blessed not to have celiacs disease have no idea how serious it is and just how SICK you get. Yes, unfortunately,crumbs from a sandwich that is made with gluten bread can set off symptoms for someone with celiacs disease . Something as common as eating out for people with celiacs disease is virtualy impossible. It isn't a choice of eating that way for a fad,. She isn 't knocking other shops, rather giving people a place to eat and not get sick. .

Anonymous said...

If you don't know what you're talking about, don't say anything at all. Surely you have Google at your finger tips, educate yourself. Cross contamination can cause severe side effects in some people.