Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Quite a set of pipes on 10th Street



Just checking in on some of the water main replacement and sewer rehab going on around parts of the neighborhood... such as here on 10th Street between Avenue A and Avenue B... EVG reader Daniel shared these photos from today...



A worker at the scene told Daniel that these pipes were from 1910 (not sure about that — but that's what he said) ...







7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Con Ed broke something today and now we've had brown water coming up this evening. Nasty. It looks like the inside of those old pipes. The truck says it should be fixed and the brown should wash out but if not call the department of water tomorrow.

Scuba Diva said...

I'd believe it, judging from the condition of some of those pipes; when I lived on St. Mark's place, the water main to the building collapsed one day.

Apparently the pipe was from the 19th century—this was an Old Law tenement, built circa 1886—and when the pipe finally wore away and the water to the building was just flowing through dirt, it collapsed and we had no water for a few days.

Luis Lopez said...

Tompins Square Library had to shut down it's doors early Wednesday. Oh Nooo!

Anonymous said...

My bank used to have on display a slice from one of the old wooden water pipes, maybe from Nieuw-Amsterdam days?

Anonymous said...

They have been working on 12th Street for weeks, and it is an inconvenience, but I am glad this work is being done. One of the workers was telling us the pipes date back to the early 1900s. Don't freak out over the brown water. That's what happens when they have to shut down the water for the day. Let the tap run.

Anonymous said...

Shut up about your brown water; that's nutritious minerals you're drinking. Back in my day we had to chew our water and we liked it.

Scuba Diva said...

At 10:46 AM, Anonymous said:

Shut up about your brown water; that's nutritious minerals you're drinking. Back in my day we had to chew our water and we liked it.

We loved it! "In my day, we didn't have Kleenex®; when you turned 17, you were given the family handkerchief."