Wednesday, August 22, 2012

EV Grieve Etc.: Mourning edition

[Bobby Williams]

City Planning Commission OKs SPURA plan (The Lo-Down)

Some history of The Claremount on East 12th Street (Off the Grid)

Mama's owner Jeremiah Clancy on the new, "very homogenous" East Village (The Atlantic)

10 "great punk songs about New York City" (Prefix)

Other Music's new record label (The Village Voice)

The trip wire atop 118 East 4th St. (Occupy East 4th Street)

What would Bloomy's big soda ban do to EV bubble tea shops? (DNAinfo)

A history of NYC's push carts (BoweryBoogie)

New music venue for Coney Island (Curbed)

Jeremiah Moss writes a High Line op-ed today for the Times titled "Disney World on the Hudson" (Jeremiah's Vanishing New York)

Bonus excerpt:
It’s easy to forget that until very recently, even with the proliferation of art galleries near the West Side Highway, West Chelsea was a mix of working-class residents and light-industrial businesses.

But the High Line is washing all that away.
[From the EVG High Line Collection]

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm with Jeremiah on the High Line issue. It's a circus. I went there when it was relatively new and enjoyed it. It was peaceful, quiet and just a great spot in general. I went back this spring and couldn't believe how many tourists where walking there. I didn't even finish the walk..I had to get off.

Goggla said...

Good interview with Mr Clancy. I'm sad to see Mama's go.

Anonymous said...

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

blue glass said...

the high line is just another glaring example of the mayor's commitment to make this city the tourist mecca of the world.
forget the charm and variety that once defined the city where one could almost afford to live.
destroy the divergent communities.
replace the affordable with sky-high rent.
what few non-chain stores remain are mostly filled with artisinal, locavore, snobbery food fascists - and then make sure that only hip, rich i-pod owners can use the apps.

THE NOTORIOUS L.I.B.E.R.A.T.I.O.N. said...

If I lived in a building feet from the High Line I'd leave my shades up, move the TV near the window, and play hardcore gay porn 24/7. Something with fisting.

"Like OH. MY. GOD! That man is, like, a muppet and stuff. GA-ROSS!"

::flip flop, flip, flop::

aveaisessex said...

I wonder if the city fully realized just how attractive the High Line would be as a tourist mecca.

When it was introduced, I too thought it would exist mostly as a sanctuary for residents. In retrospect, the current state of affairs makes perfect sense: it's free, it's trendy, it's "OMG so New York"-y (for tourists), and it's free.

Was this planned as an elevated conveyance for the flabby-armed all along?

Jeremiah Moss said...

thanks Grieve--i love that photo! sums it right up.

Anonymous said...

Yeah so it is touristy. So, that means you can never find a time to go & enjoy the Highline. parts of downtown look like the welfare office, but I find ways to enjoy it.

nygrump said...

This neighborhood and the E. Vil are targets because they (used to) support active dissent, not twitter facebook occupy bs, but real organizing and political work. Its a war on us to force the area into expensive consumer and upper class transient zones.

tiny tim said...

I can't see her face, but I think I take the one with the burberry bag. I got a thing for blondes, even fake ones.

randall said...

Can't see the line, can you Russ?

Anonymous said...

No. Yes. Yes.