Friday, March 27, 2015

Update: 2 people now reported missing; 25 injured after yesterday's 2nd Avenue explosion


[2nd Avenue this morning via Vinny & O]

NY1 has an update on yesterday's explosion:

Two people are listed as being unaccounted for as investigators keep looking into Thursday's explosion in the East Village that injured more than two dozen people and brought down three buildings.

The NYPD says official missing persons reports have not yet been filed, but are under further verification and investigation.

The FDNY says the number of those injured now stands at 25. They include 20 civilians, four firefighters and one EMS worker.

Four of the injured are in critical condition.

While the cause of the blast and subsequent fire that destroyed 119, 121 and 123 Second Ave. remains under investigation, Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro told reporters: "To the best of our knowledge, they were working on the gas in the building [No. 121]."

Also, NY1 reports that, according to City Councilmember Rosie Mendez, 11 nearby buildings in the area have evacuation orders, which includes 144 apartments.

"Mendez says 80 people — 79 adults and one baby — have registered with the Red Cross. She says 30 people — 29 adults and one baby — need a place to stay."



Updated 9:54 a.m. Here is a photo of Nicholas Figueroa, 23, who was eating at Sushi Park with a co-worker at the time of the blast. He remains unaccounted for...



The Wall Street Journal reports that Moises Lucon, who worked at Sushi Park, 121 Second Ave., is the second man missing after the blast.

Previously

18 comments:

Greg Masters said...

Thank you EV for your exceptional coverage of this tragic and sure-to-be transformative neighborhood event.

Anonymous said...

The New York Times has identified one of the missing as Nicholas Figueroa. He was in the restaurant at the time and had paid his check just before the explosion. Here is a link to the story with a photo in case anyone spots him. I am wondering if he might have been injured and wandered away from the scene: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/28/nyregion/family-searches-for-missing-son-after-blast-in-the-east-village.html

Anonymous said...

To add to what I posted before, this story has two pictures of Nicholas Figueroa. Please keep your eyes open for him. He could have been hurt and stunned by the blast and walked away from the scene: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/27/nicholas-figueroa-missing-explosion-east-village_n_6954446.html

Chief Primatologist of the East Village Inky said...

Thank you for your excellent coverage. Your site is the first one I visited when I heard the news.

Goggla said...

Thank you for the updates, Grieve. You're an amazing reporter. During times of crisis, I know I can check here first and get up-to-date info on the situation and check in with neighbors. Your site is a truly essential service for all of us.

Anonymous said...

The coverage has been excellent. Well done. Let's keep praying for the victims, especially those injured or yet unaccounted for.

Anonymous said...

The human loss really hits home when you see a picture of a possible victim of this tragedy.

Note said...

Does anyone have any information regarding where to drop donations? I'd like to buy some things (food, clothes, etc.) for those affected.

Note said...

Does anyone have any information regarding where to drop donations? I'd like to buy some things (food, clothes, etc.) for those affected.

Anonymous said...

If there is any way to legitimately donate money to help all those affected, would someone please specify? (And I mean other than donating to the Salvation Army or similar.) I'm sure the community would come together to provide financial help, as well as food & clothing.

Those who lost everything, as well as those who are currently (and hopefully temporarily) evacuated, deserve all the help we can provide.

My prayers go out to all, and I hope Mr. Figueroa is found alive.

Anonymous said...

hey Grieve...ditto on both your excellent coverage of this horrible (let's hope not intentional) tragedy. My heart goes out to everyone affected, especially those in neighboring now destabilized buildings (that's really just awful as well). And ditto on providing info on how regular folks can help our neighbors with donations and supplies. I'd like to make a contribution as well.

BagelGuy said...

I am not sure about where to donate money but, we went down to PS 63 last night with a bunch of food for the next day's breakfast. There are lots of Red Cross people there and I am sure they can answer questions regarding cash donations.

Anonymous said...

Deborah Glick has sent out an email saying that the Mayor's Office has set up a fund to which donations can be made to help those affected by this disaster. This is the relevant part of her email:

Helping those Impacted

In kind donations might be accepted next week, but for the time being, money that can be used to purchase needed items is most important. If you are concerned and wish to donate, the fastest way to get money to people is through the New York City Mayor's Fund at: NYC.gov/EVRelief

Checks should be made out to the NYC Mayor's Fund with a note that they are earmarked for the East Village Collapse.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know how one can volunteer for this in any capacity?

Anonymous said...

Thanks, EV Grieve, for your committed and continuous coverage. You're the best!

Anonymous said...

What a cute guy! It doesn't look good, does it? Unimaginable for his loved ones. Gut wrenching.

Anonymous said...

The receipt his family obtained from the bank was minutes before the blast. Maybe the bathroom was downstairs? And stock room, explaining the other gentleman missing.
Love and hugs to both families. The brothers of the young man on a date portrayed such a tight and loving family. So sad. I saw a few missing posters for him on 9th st, it just brings me back to 2001. I'm sure many people are feeling the same. Hug your loved ones often.

Anonymous said...

This poor kid had his entire life in front of him. So did the other guy too. This is a senseless disaster that could have been prevented by the hands of competent professionals. Unspeakable.