Monday, October 10, 2016

(More) Condos coming soon on East Houston



The banner is up at the new 10-story building on East Houston at Suffolk... and sounding rather ominous: "Condos coming soon."



There is a teaser site where potential condo owners can sign up to receive more info. There aren't any further details, other than a tagline of sorts: "Floor-through condominiums in the heart of the Lower East Side."

In 2008, developer 265 East Houston LLC purchased the plot on Houston and Suffolk from Iglesia Pentecostal Arca de Salvacion (below) for $500,000, public records show.


[Via]

Work here on at 265 E. Houston St. (aka 179 Suffolk St.) dates to early 2010. As you may recall, construction in the pit destabilized the building next door at No. 255, which caused Action for Progress to vacate.

And as you can see, No. 255 is no more. Workers recently wrapped up that demolition...





Developer Samy Mahfar, the property's owner, has approved plans for a 10-story residential complex here.

And so the development gold rush continues along the East Houston corridor...

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

Last one out turn off the lights.

Anonymous said...

the church sold a corner lot with that awesome building on it for what is essentially the price of a studio in manhattan?!?!?

Anonymous said...

Who the hell negotiated that "deal" for the church? They got $500,000 for that lot? In 2008?

NOTORIOUS said...

More unaffordable housing and they managed to destroy the affordable housing next door. Good job "265 East Houston LLC"... whoever you are.

Anonymous said...

I've just signed up to receive priority information. This could be an exciting development--floor-thru condos with what I presume will be high end touches and high end appliances. New York is the financial capitol of the world, and there are lots of people like me who are making money and want to live in an apartment in the neighborhood near to our work and where we relax in bars and restaurants. Sorry for you old timers, I am not into living in a fifth floor walk-up nor would I want to live in something like the crappy apartments being torn down on East 11th Street. Face it, the East Village is a hot neighborhood, and those of us moving in now can afford to think high end.

Michael Ivan said...

Wanker...

NOTORIOUS said...

@1:14 It's pretty obvious from your weak laundry list of talking points that you're either an agent or someone associated with the anonymous LLC. Please stop trolling and return to your other part time job of commenting unicorn emojis on Kim Kardashian's Instagram photos.

Gojira said...

Wonder how much that construction crew got paid under the table to destabilize 255? No way it was an accident.

Anon. 1:14, you just made me throw up in my mouth. What a shallow, pathetic drip you obviously are; can't wait until you move back to whatever swamp you spawned in. New York is polluted enough.

Anonymous said...

Gojira, glad you were able to throw up at my post. Sorry I can't wax poetic as many of the posters do here about the next pizza stand or bagel shop or the empire biscuits store. Most of the posters here are concerned with the next restaurant (that they will never patronize) and their fond memories of walk up apartments with bathtubs in the kitchen. Sorry, lots of us moved into the East Village for reasons you envy.

Anonymous said...

Wanker. We also remember the downturns. And they include people not being able to find a job or pay their mortgages.

Sod off. Everything you do, see, hear, taste, is the product of people who have a place here and aren't RICH. It's impossible to make people like you understand this. But one day you will.

I'm sure of that.

Anonymous said...

Envy? As my southern friends would say:
"Bless [it's] heart".

Anonymous said...

In defense of Anon 1:14: Yes, I notice how some posters on this blog are able to do more than just vent their anger at somebody who they don't agree with. You're the same people who posted and posted and couldn't save the St Marks Book Store. Probably because you hadn't bought a book except via Amazon for years. In many ways some of you are typical supporters of Trump--anyone who disagrees with you has to go through extreme vetting--they are outsiders--not real residents of the East Village. They are here for all the wrong reasons, they don't belong here, and they should be sent back where they came from. Yeah, the spirit of the East Village--freedom to believe.

Henri Cervantes said...

anon 1:14 - Donald T, is that you? have a nice life.

Anonymous said...

8:59 PM: The posters here don't speak with one voice, though some voices are louder than others. I recall a lot of anti-St. Mark's Bookstore sentiment, based upon their repeated trips to the crowdsourcing trough, and their self-satisfied customer service. The EV always had some balance between the old and the new, high and low, rich and not-so-rich. Sorry if some of us don't like the real estate colonizers taking over, not with guns, but with money...

Anonymous said...

"is the product of people who have a place here and aren't RICH"

Actually not true. It takes a lot of money to open a restaurant/bar/market/store/etc in this neighborhood now. And people do it so they can become even richer. So the commercial places welcome customers who have money to burn and their friends. The area was an urban blight in 70s for various reasons including that it was a concentrated area of poverty and drugs. Today it a vibrant bustling tourist hangout with cleaner streets, almost no empty buildings and is generating lots of taxes for the city, jobs for people and the area has been revitalized. Condos and coops are great as it is ownership which means investment in the neighborhood.

Anonymous said...

tourist hangout? fuck off.

Anonymous said...

It's interesting how 10:14 posts about wanting to live near bars and restaurants. I think he or she may soon discover that a neighborhood transforming into another midtown will not long remain a fun, vibrant place to live. There are reasons midtown is mostly a dull area--because more interesting businesses can't pay the rents (because they are not cookie-cutter chains with deep corporate pockets), and because many people actually don't want to live in a sea of bland high-rises with duane reade at the bottom floor. Instead, a mix of low buildings, stoops for people to hang out on and talk, small shops with unique things to sell, community gardens and street art is what has made the east village such a "fun" place to live for so long, and why restaurants/bars try to open here rather than midtown. I live in fear now that my favorite places will be gone in an instant--the fabric of the EV now feels so precarious. When I visit other cities, I'm surprised now to see businesses that can boast that they've been open more than a decade, arts organizations that are opening rather than closing or fighting for their life, bookstores (!), a neighborhood of people who care about where they live and are deeply invested. All this has been so undermined the last decade. But I guess 10:14 can then move onto the next gentrifying area when he or she gets bored with the sterility of the area that he/she helped cause. Money allows one to do that, rather than grow deep roots where one lives.

Jed said...

Anon 1:14 is either a troll or a shill. Anyone expecting high end touches or appliances is bound to be disappointed. I watched this building go up and witnessed the contractors do some pretty questionable things to cut corners.

Anonymous said...

9:36. You are a simpleton.