Wednesday, April 6, 2016

11 stories of condos to join the growing East Houston residential corridor


[Via Google Street View]

A new residential project has been in the works for East Houston between Clinton and Suffolk going back to late 2014. (BoweryBoogie and NY Yimby had the coverage.)

Plans call for 11 stories of condominiums at 287 E. Houston, at the site of this now-vacant two-story building. (Previously it housed a tax-preparation business; a landscaping business also used part of the property.)

And yesterday, NY Yimby got the first look at a rendering for the development (in two pieces)...




Here are the details via NYY:

The 120-foot-tall building will hold 28 apartments and slightly more than 29,000 square feet of residential space ... The boutique development will have two to four apartments on each story, including two duplexes on the first and second floors and a penthouse duplex on the top two floors. The plans indicate that the penthouse will have a private roof deck, and the rest of the residents will have access to a shared terrace. The apartments will range from one- to three-bedrooms, and asking prices will start at $1.1 million and go up to $5 million, according to PR reps for the development.

To date, though, the plans are awaiting city approval. There is a teaser site up to register for more residential info.

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Maybe this is a good time to do an East Houston new residential development recap...

The Adele at Avenue D...



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Jones LES between Attorney and Ridge...



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179 Suffolk St. ...


[Old photo!]

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PROPOSED!

255 E. Houston between Suffolk and Norfolk...



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223-225 E. Houston St. at Essex...



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TK TK TK

196 Orchard. St. ...



And under TK maybe. There are also plans for a new development at the former Mobil station property at East Second Street and Avenue C...this is the last rendering we've seen... from November 2014...new building plans still await city approval ...

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

what great architecture, square boxes on boxes... so creative, ugh.

NOTORIOUS said...

I'm not sure what's worse, this uninspired new take on brutalist architecture or the wackadoo creations of Bjork Bonkers happening on the west side.

nygrump said...

I need more coffee, I keep seeing the word 'horror' in this headline


11 stories of condo horror to join the growing East Houston residential corridor

11 stories of condos to join the growing East Houston residential horror

Giovanni said...

New word: A horrible corridor of new condos = A horridor.

Ex: "Have you seen all those new condos going up on East Houston lately? It's a real horridor."

Anonymous said...

Eush, what's with the vogue for grey/black brick with these developers? I look at renderings like this and I imagine them saying "How can we make this EVEN UGLIER?"

At least there's no eyesore balconies everywhere like you see on the Upper East Side, I guess...

Goggla said...

"Horridor" is a perfect name for this godawful depressing dark gray color.

Anonymous said...

@10:32 AM: Why do balconies have to be so ugly? Is there something inherent in the nature of balconies? You rarely see anyone out on one, but I guess they are useful for plants, laundry, bicyles, etc.

Anonymous said...

I guess oil spill gray is the new color of choice for NYC architects. Maybe there are depressed like me.

NOTORIOUS said...

@12:29 And kegs! #julietbalconyrager

Anonymous said...

pretty soon this city is going to look like the one in the Warner Brothers cartoon where the guy finds a singing frog in the cornerstone of an older building he's demolishing. boooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!

Anonymous said...

My God NYC architects must be so BORED. The developers literally build the same bldg over & over & over, same outside & inside just different configurations.

Gojira said...

You can probably use the same rendering for each development. They all look alike.

Anonymous said...

It may be time to switch our pronounciation of Houston to the Texas style. It is going to look to a newcomer like they named that street due to its architectural similarity to the infamously anonymous and overbearing buildings of "Space City." -- Mark from 11th Street

Anonymous said...

I love the look of the Houston & Essex building.

Anonymous said...

..are we supposed to be excited for more glass towers for the uber rich invading our neighborhood? what do they even contribute to our communities other than displacing longterm residents and authentic culture.