Monday, September 27, 2021

Looking at the new mosaics inside the 1st Avenue L stop

Back on Thursday, the MTA unveiled a mosaic series by local artist Katherine Bradford throughout the First Avenue (and Avenue A!) L stop. 

Per the MTA: "Reflecting the community of people who use the 1 Av-14 St station, vibrant compositions totaling about 400 sq ft of glass mosaic ... are installed throughout the station."
Here's more via @mtaartsdesign:
The intriguing, ethereal figures seen in the mosaic panels represent the riders of the L train, which transports creative folk pursuing their dreams and the real-life heroes who provide essential services. 
In New York, these riders are dressed most often in black, which the artist believes is "merely a cloak over an inner life that is wildly colorful and unconventional." This group of figures expresses the energy of camaraderie when people are gathered together and inspires viewers to consider the outward expression of one’s own interior vivacity.
Artist Marcel Dzama created a series for the Bedford stop. This post at 6sqft has more photos of the mosaics at the First Avenue and Bedford stations.

Art pics via @mtaartsdesign

6 comments:

ralph repo said...

While I appreciate art, what would have been a much better approach would have been to incorporate a human presence into these stations 24/7 so that safety and a feeling of security can be present at all hours. In fact, the NYC transit system historically used to have a variety of retail space within many stations; when they did away with this it was a huge disservice to customers. They need to bring back the kiosks.

Unknown said...

"In New York, these riders are dressed most often in black, which the artist believes is "merely a cloak over an inner life that is wildly colorful and unconventional." This group of figures expresses the energy of camaraderie when people are gathered together and inspires viewers to consider the outward expression of one’s own interior vivacity"

How utterly ridiculous.

Ronnie said...

perhaps instead of all the mosaics being installed in so many stations the focus could be making stations accessible to those with disabilities

Anonymous said...

Tough crowd! I like the mosaics and especially love encountering the one at the SW entrance on 1st Avenue as you go down the stairs.

John Penley said...

Jim Power is a neighborhood resident , a legendary mosaic artist, Vietnam Vet and severely disabled so why does the MTA not hire him to do some of this work ? I thought the MTA helped Vets , especially combat vets , so why not help Jim with some paid work ?

Anonymous said...

while its very easy to be a critic, nothing particular to this artist- it does seem from that description and from what I see in a lot of art in the neighborhood- artists today seem more uniquely out of touch than they have at any point in recent memory.