Thursday, August 4, 2016

Workers remove American Elm in Tompkins Square Park



As we understand it, part of the tree broke off about 10 days ago... apparently the trunk was rotting, and workers had to take it down, per Park sources...

EVG correspondent Steven shared these photos...









For reference purposes, the tree was in the Sandra Turner Garden... between Temperance Fountain and the ping-pong table...

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

In past five years quite a few of these hundred year old plus hardwoods have been loss except for removing diseased ones that are a danger nothing else is done. There is no pruning of remaining ones no planting of hardwoods to replace them. They do not have to be elm but other large hardwoods like oak or walnut.This park needs a conservatory to direct it and improve it...the city neglect is obvious it's main function seems to be for the court system doling out community service for free cleaning of the walkways. This park could be so much more than it is under the right stewardship.

Goggla said...

Nooo! This was a favorite hawk tree. However, I was kind of surprised it wasn't removed a couple of years ago, when the top was chopped off.

The sapling that replaced one of the giant elms near the chess tables is dead. The one that is near the band shell has had to be replaced, and I don't know that any of the other lost big trees have been replaced with anything. I remember a time when you had to search for a bench in the sun. Now you have to search for one in the shade.

Gojira said...

Always heartbreaking to lose one of the big old ones. Maybe one of the developers getting multi-million dollar tax breaks and making obscene profits off of the East Village would like to step up and set up a well-financed TSP fund for the purpose of improving the park? Think of how they could include that in their prospectuses! (Prospecti?)

JQ LLC said...

What happened to the million trees program? Did they plant all of them?

And why couldn't they replace all the old dead and dying ones? Since a majority of them are in parks.

Anonymous said...

Sorry Gojira, I usually agree with but the last thing we need is private developers getting financially involved in one of our city (taxpayer) parks.

Anonymous said...

A RE developer is interested in its air rights.

Anonymous said...

11:10am Trees New York used to be a force for good, now it's just a dummy where you can take a "citizen's pruner course" for $100 or so a pop, a total scam as 1. you don't need four classes and a field trip to be a citizen pruner, one six hour session 9am-noon then 1-4pm would do and 2. what good is the course when you can't practice what you learned?